Tinkers End

Tinkers End from the south
This photo (probably taken before 1901) shows Prince Albert Row on the left, some of the overcrowded housing in the middle, and Short Lane on the far right. The Boot and Tinkers End Cottage are just visible in the distance. The road was widened in 1935 after many years of complaints.

The earliest reference to the name Tinkers End which we've found so far is from 1698. There is no sign of it on the 1599 map, but that doesn't necessarily mean it didn't already exist then. The only surviving 17th-century building is Tinkers End Cottage (3 Granborough Road). Another was replaced by The Boot (1 Granborough Road) in the 1830s. The lane leading from Granborough Road towards The Walk known as Short (or occasionally Short's) Lane had a brickyard, and a number of houses on the site now occupied by 7 Granborough Road. On the west side of Granborough Road, Prince Albert Row or Albert Place (30-36 Granborough Road) was built in 1840, and there were other houses on the sites occupied by numbers 24-30A, with a "tin tabernacle" where the entry to Chiltern Court is now. Granborough Road itself was usually known as Claydon Road.

Tinkers End underwent drastic population growth in the mid-19th century. This seems to have been achieved mainly by subdividing existing houses, leading to very poor living conditions. 6% of Winslow's population lived there in 1851 and 7% in 1871. The inhabitants were nearly all low-paid agricultural workers, many from the same families for several generations (e.g. Holt, Saving, Turney). Tinkers End was seen by some of the respectable residents of Winslow (who actually owned the slum properties) as an outpost full of infectious diseases which needed its own mission church. The creation of the Rural District Council with its Sanitary Inspector led to the gradual demolition of the worst housing; there were 25 households in 1871, 13 in 1911 and 9 in 1939.

The information below has been divided into sections. Please click on the links to go directly to them.


Tinkers End: general history

Tinkers End on 1770 and 1825 maps
The 1770 Jefferys (left) and 1825 Bryant maps showing Tinkers End; details of individual houses are probably not reliable

1825: Northampton Mercury, 12 Feb
Coroner's inquest. At Tinker's End, in the parish of Winslow, on view of the body of Ruth, wife of John Walker, labourer, who, being left alone for a short time in the evening, fell into the fire ... Verdict -- Accidental Death.

1848: Banbury Guardian, 3 Aug
ASSAULT BY IRISH LABOURERS.
On Sunday evening, the 23rd of July, a number of Irish labourers created a considerable disturbance, and violently assaulted several of the inhabitants, who reside in a suburban part of town called “Tinker’s End”. They at first inquired of a lodging house to be accommodated for the night, but being refused, urged their demands at the neighbouring cottages, the inmates of which were indisposed to admit them ... A quiet and inoffensive tailor whose residence was hard by [?John Craker, in 1851 Census], on hearing the tumult, sallied forth from his domicile to ascertain the cause of such unearthly sounds upon the evening of a day [Sunday] that is remarkable in Winslow for order and decorum. Scarcely had he reached the scene of the disorder, and without uttering a word of provocation, when one of these Celtic ruffians raised his ponderous shelalah and with a violent blow brought this knight of the thimble to the ground, while others of his neighbours received a full share of bruises and black eyes from these turbulent assailants. The following day they were taken before the Magistrate and fined in various sums ...

1862: Oxford Chronicle, 25 Jan
On Monday, the 20th inst., an inquest was held at the Boot public-house, in Tinker's End, before F. Budd, Esq., deputy coroner, on the body of Elizabeth Ann Foskett, aged five years, who was burnt to death on the Saturday previous. It appeared in evidence that the deceased and another child were left in the house together whilst the mother (who had nothing in the house for dinner) went to Mrs. Stairs' to borrow some bread, and when there the little boy rushed in and told her that Lizzey was on fire; she ran home as quickly as possible, but the child had everything burnt off by the time she arrived, and died almost immediately afterwards. Verdict -- "Accidental death."

1865: Buckingham Advertiser, 20 May
In Dr. Hunter's recent report the following remarks occur:- "At Tinker's End, near Winslow, in Buckinghamshire, I saw a bedroom in which slept four adults with five children, and which measured 11 feet by 9 by 6 feet 5 inches at the highest point; another was 11 feet 7 by 9 by 5 feet 10, and contained six persons. Each of these families had less than the allowance necessary to one single convict. No houses had more than one bed room, none had any back door; water was very scarce; the rents from 1s. up to 2s. In 16 houses visited, only one man could be heard of who could earn above 10s. a week. The reservoir of air alloted to each person in the case mentioned may be described as about equal to his being shut up all night in a box four feet cube; but of course the miserable old huts were well provided with unintentional ventilation."

1879: Oxford Journal, 18 May
On Saturday, May 10, at the Plough Inn, Winslow, before R. D'Ath, Esq., Coroner, an inquest was held on view of the body of Harry Saving, aged three years, son of Harry Saving, farm labourer, who was drowned in a pond in Tinker's End, on the previous evening. From the evidence of the father it seems deceased went out to play at "tip-cat" just as the mother started on some errands. The child said, "I am going to auntie's", the aunt living just opposite the pond. -- Charles Walker said he was driving into Winslow from North Marston when he saw something in the pond ... Samson Smith, an uncle of the child (also called as a witness), ran out of his house and got the child out of the water immediately ... The pond was fenced round, as other children had previously fallen in ... Verdict: "Accidentally drowned".

1879: Bucks Herald, 22 Nov
THE BAPTIST TABERNACLE.--A public meeting to celebtrate the first anniversary of the settlement of the Rev. F.J. Feltham as pastor of this place of worship was held on Tuesday evening ... Mission Rooms had been opened at Tinker's End and Singleborough ...

Map of Tinkers End, 1880
Tinkers End shown on the 1880 25 inch to the mile map (names in blue added)

1888: Buckingham Advertiser, 29 Sep
... At 10 o'clock the [Salvation Army] soldiers met at the Barracks, and with the band to the front marched to Tinker's End, where a meeting was held for about half-an-hour, during which time the Capt. and Lieut. farewelled, the Capt. remarking that Tinker's End would always have a warm place in her heart.

1889: Buckingham Advertiser, 13 Nov
A case of typhoid fever was reported [to the Board of Guardians] in Tinker's End at Winslow, and the inhabitants of of some of the dwelling there were described as living more like pigs than human beings. It is true that in some instances the dwellings of the poor are in a delapidated [sic] state; but it is equally true that some of the inmates are far from clean, and thereby largely add to the insanitary state of the places.

1897: Bucks Herald, 6 March
The Medical Officer (Dr. T.F. Vaisey) reported as the result of a visit to Tinker's End that all the cottages previously complained of were old, but the tenants said they could not pay any higher rents. There were three empty cottages in the district.

1909: Buckingham Advertiser, 11 Dec
Winslow Rural District Council. Mr Wise reported a case of overcrowding in a cottage occupied by Henry G. Walker, Tinker's End, Winslow. The father, mother, and daughter (aged 18) and son (aged 16), and a baby (aged 2 years), all slept in one small bedroom. The daughter was going out to service. The members said it was a very bad case, but they could not deal with the moral side of the question.
Mr Wise reported another case of overcrowding at Tinker's End in a cottage occupied by Thomas Saving. The father, mother, and four little children, all under 5 years of age, slept in one small bedroom. In this case there was another small room which could be made into a bedroom.

1930: Buckingham Advertiser, 3 May
Antiquarian Notes by A.J. Clear, re May Day over 60 years ago
Then I think Tinker's End Feast was held on that day for all the sweeps and the bakers used to parade the town in the morning with their Jack-in-the-Green and Dicky Loveridge dressed up as a woman, their fiddler and old Mrs. Smith carrying the money box, and then at night, Tinker's End wasn't half lively.

1935: Buckingham Advertiser, 31 Aug
The spectacle of a large Greenham giant navvy at work on the road widening operations at Tinker's End, Winslow, has created some interest.

1936: Buckingham Advertiser, 22 Aug
Winslow Rural District Council. Mr Monk said that they wanted more houses in Winslow and the Chairman agreed observing that they had ground there and they might as well build on it. ... The Sanitary Inspector [re overcrowding] had in mind an old cottage at Shipton and two at Tinkers End. Mr Monk: I understood they were all condemned at Tinkers End.

Google Earth view of Tinkers End
Google Earth view of Tinkers End showing Prince Albert Row (left) and the former Boot (furthest white building). Below, you can see Tinkers End and Granborough Road on the 1880 and 1978 Ordnance Survey maps. Only Prince Albert Row, The Boot and Tinkers End Cottage (the last two much altered) are on both maps.
1880 and 1978 maps of Tinkers End


Census returns

Names and occupations of heads of household are listed. The road names used by the enumerators are shown in bold. Sometimes the enumerator started from The Walk, sometimes from Tuckey Farm and sometimes from Western Lane, so the houses are in a different order each time. In 1891 and 1901 the number of rooms in each house was listed if fewer than 5; in 1911 it was listed for all houses.

1841 1851 1861
District 2: Albert Place Tinkers End [the list starts on the west side of Granborough Road, presumably at the north end] Claydon Road [the list starts on the west side of Granborough Road at the north end]
Thomas Seaton, agricultural labourer James North, agricultural labourer 1 unoccupied
Benjamin Bates, agricultural labourer John Reading, agricultural labourer William Fortnum, tailor
George Clark, agricultural labourer John Roads, agricultural labourer George Smith, agricultural labourer
Thomas Radwill, agricultural labourer Thomas Newman, agricultural labourer George Holt, agricultural labourer
Charlotte Lucket George Clark, brazier Philip Walker, agricultural labourer
Tinkers End [west of Granborough Road] Philip Budd, agricultural labourer Thomas Seaton, agricultural labourer
Thomas Scott, agricultural labourer Henry Newman, agricultural labourer George Phillips, baker
Joseph Evans, agricultural labourer John Craker, tailor Edward Jackman, blacksmith [Prince Albert Row; see 1871]
Richard Willmore, agricultural labourer William Grubb, rail labourer Thomas Weston, agricultural labourer
Charles Walker, agricultural labourer Richard Seaton, agricultural labourer 1 unoccupied
John Beddell, agricultural labourer Thomas Seaton, agricultural labourer George Seaton, agricultural labourer
William Higgins, agricultural labourer Hannah Pickett, outdoor pauper Philip Budd, railway labourer
George Alderman, agricultural labourer Thomas Cox, agricultural labourer [Short Lane; see will of John Cox below] Frederick Verney, blacksmith
District 3 [the first 4 are Short Lane, the next 2 Tinkers End Cottage]: Tinkers End
Jane Sharp, pauper 1 unoccupied
William Bates sr, tanner James Verney, blacksmith Thomas Cox, agricultural labourer [Short Lane]
Daniel Holt, agricultural labourer David Smith, agricultural labourer John Reddin, agricultural labourer
George Holt, agricultural labourer Robert Verney, agricultural labourer George Stairs, agricultural labourer
George Walker, agricultural labourer William Verney, agricultural labourer Bishop Norman, agricultural labourer
William Keys, cordwainer John Elliott, agricultural labourer John Elliott, agricultural labourer
George Redding, agricultural labourer William Warr, agricultural labourer [Tinkers End Cottage] William Saving, agricultural labourer
The Boot: James Tuckey, 60, publican + wife Sarah, 45 + 2 lodgers John Westley, agricultural labourer James Chapman, brickmaker
  The Boot: Samuel Rowe, victualler, 36, b. Stewkley + wife Elizabeth, 30, b. Winslow + 17 lodgers William Warr, carpenter [Tinkers End Cottage]
  Catharine Smith, lacemaker John Weseley, agricultural labourer
  George Reading, agricultural labourer George Reddin, agricultural labourer
    The Boot: Samuel Rowe, victualler, 43, b. Stewkley + wife Elizabeth, 60 [sic], b. Winslow + 6 lodgers
Total population: 75 Total population: 110 Total population: 95
     
1871 1881 1891
Tinkers End [the first 8 seem to be in Short Lane, the other 7 on the west side of the road, starting at the north end]: Tinkers End [the first 7 seem to be in Short Lane; the next 6 include Prince Albert Row]: Tinkers End
William Miller, brickmaker George White, agricultural labourer Common Lodging House [Boot; counted as 2 houses]: Thomas King, 61, innkeeper, b. Great Horwood + wife & family + 14 lodgers
Emma Warner, laundress Alfred Viccars, agricultural labourer John Wesley, thatcher, 4 rooms [Tinkers End Cottage]
George Alderman, hay binder William Turney, general labourer William Turner, blind, 4 rooms
William Turney, agricultural labourer Joseph Turney, agricultural labourer William Miller, brickmaker, 4 rooms [Short Lane]
Joseph Turney, agricultural labourer 1 gone to London John Jonson, railway pensioner, 2 rooms
Mary A. Hancock, needlewoman William Painter, brickmaker George White, agricultural labourer, 2 rooms
William Archer, agricultural labourer William Miller, brickmaker Joseph Turney, general labourer, 4 rooms
Thomas Cox, labourer Henry Saving, chimney sweep Henry Smith, agricultural labourer, 3 rooms
William Smith, agricultural labourer George Holt, general labourer Edmund Jennings, army pensioner, 2 rooms
William Fortnum, tailor William Saving, agricultural labourer George Holt, agricultural labourer, 4 rooms [west side of road]
George Smith, agricultural labourer William Holt, agricultural labourer
1 unoccupied
George Holt, hawker (licensed) Jabez Cook, bootmaker William Saving, agricultural labourer, 4 rooms
Samson Smith, umbrella mender Thomas Newman, agricultural labourer William Holt, agricultural labourer, 3 rooms
Thomas Seaton, agricultural labourer William Turner, blind [Tinkers End Cottage]
George Warner, letter carrier, 4 rooms
Joseph Saving, chimney sweep John Wesley, general labourer Henry Saving, chimney sweep, 4 rooms [Prince Albert Row]
Albert Place:
Boot Inn Common Lodging House: John Powell, 34, innkeeper, b. Herefs + wife + 7 children + 6 lodgers (5 labelled "tramps") 1 unoccupied
Edward Jackman, blacksmith Jabez Cook, shoemaker, 4 rooms
James Field, rural postman Joseph Warner, agricultural labourer, 4 rooms
William Foskett, agricultural labourer    
Henry Holt, agricultural labourer    
William Saving, agricultural labourer    
Bishop Norman, agricultural labourer    
Tinkers End [Tinkers End Cottage]:    
William Warr, agricultural labourer    
John Wesley, agricultural labourer    
William Archer, agricultural labourer    
Boot Public House, Lodging House: Arthur Jeffs, 58, publican, b. Watlington + wife Martha, 49, b. Oxford, + son + 16 lodgers    
Total population: 129    
     
1901 1911 1939: Hillier's Almanack
Tinkers End [west side, starting at Prince Albert Row]: Tinkers End [west side, last 4 are Prince Albert Row] Tinker's End
1 unoccupied Tom Saving, general labourer, 3 rooms Boot Inn: Burgin, A.J.
Jabez Cook, shoemaker, 4 rooms Elizabeth Saving, 3 rooms 5 Averay, O.G.
John Saving, cattleman on farm, 4 rooms John Saving, farm labourer, 4 rooms [gave his address as Claydon Road] 6 Saving, J. [6. 8, 10 & 12 = Prince Albert Row; there were no other houses left on the west side of the road]
William Holt, ordinary agricultural labourer, 4 rooms Thomas Anderson, hawker, 4 rooms 8 Phillips, E.
Amos Phillips, ordinary agricultural labourer, 4 rooms Elijah Phillips, farm labourer, 4 rooms [gave his address as Claydon Road] 9 [blank]
William Saving, cattleman on farm, 4 rooms Jabez Cook, bootmaker, 4 rooms 10 Willmore, M.A.
George Holt, carter on farm, 4 rooms Tinkers End [east side]: 11 Welsh, Jas.
Short Lane: Thomas Turney, farm labourer, 5 rooms 12 Matthews, T.
Thomas Turney, ordinary agricultural labourer Ernest Dillon, dealer in marine stores, Short Lane, 2 rooms 13 [blank]
1 unoccupied William Turney, jobbing gardener, Short Lane, 2 rooms  
George White, ordinary agricultual labourer, 2 rooms Kate Jennings, 2 rooms  
John Grace, bricklayer (retired), 3 rooms Thomas Turner, farm labourer, 4 rooms [Tinkers End Cottage]  
William Turney, general labourer, 2 rooms Jabez Price, dealer in stock, 4 rooms  
Ann Stairs, washerwoman, 3 rooms Boot Inn: Frederick James Crisp, 40, licensed victualler, b. Crewe + family + 1 servant + 3 boarders + 3 visitors, 10 rooms  
Catherine Jennings, 3 rooms    
Tinkers End [Tinkers End Cottage]:    
William Turner, blind, 4 rooms    
Jabez Price, dealer in cattle, 4 rooms    
Boot Inn: Charles Langley, 30, innkeeper, b. Old Stratford + family + 1 boarder + 3 visitors    

Tinkers End Cottage

The very early (1698) reference to Tinkers End seems to concern what is now Tinkers End Cottage, which enables its ownership to be traced in some earlier court rolls.

1663: Manor Court, 19 Oct
Thomas Pease surrendered a cottage. To the use of John Hobcroft on condition that the surrender will be void if Thomas pays him 14s 4d on 29 Sep 1664 and 1665 and £12 14s 4d on 29 Sep 1666. Rent 2d, fine 5s.
John Hobcroft surrendered a cottage with The Backside to the use of Thomas Pease. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

1669: Manor Court, 2 Oct
Thomas Pease and Elizabeth his wife surrendered a messuage in Winslowe with all buildings, yard(s?) [penetral'], orchards and gardens. To their own use for their lives, then to the use of Thomas Kinge son of Walter Kinge of Middle Claydon farmer. Rent 2d, fine 5s, heriot 5s.

1684: Manor Court, 17 Oct
Henry King, who held a messuage in Winslow in reversion after the deaths of Thomas Pease and Elizabeth his wife, died since the last court. Henry King his son and next heir sought admission. Rent [blank], fine 5s, fealty respited.

1698: Manor Court, 25 April
Henry King and Joan King widow surrendered a cottage now in the occupation of William Fennimore scituate in Tinkers End, the common street west, with yards, outhouses and orchards. To the use of Samuel Wilston and Dyonisia his wife ...

1706: Manor Court, 21 June
Samuel Willstone surrendered his domicile in Winslowe with orchard adjoining. To the use of Daniel Gyles, on condition to be void if Samuel pays him £10 6s on 20 Dec next at Daniel's domicile.

1709: Manor Court, 9 May
Samuel Wilston surrendered part of a bay of structure in Tinkers End in the occupation of Thomas Goodier with the way or passage on the west side of the bay (reserving always to William Gibbs free passage over and through the said passage). To the use of Thomas Blake gent., Richard Bigg gent., John Henley and Augustine Seaton on special trust that they permit the vicar and churchwardens and overseers of Winslow to expend and disburse the rent and revenue of the premisses for the use and benefit of the poor inhabitants of the parish of Winslowe in perpetuity.

1710: Manor Court [this might be a different property]
Samuel Willson on 22 Aug surrendered all his standing and right in a cottage in Winslowe where he now lives, with orchard. To the use of Robert Eden of Winslow, carpenter. On condition to be void if Samuel pays him £5 2s 6d on 3 Feb next at Robert's domicile in Winslowe.

1714: Manor Court
Samuel Wilston and Daniel Gyles surrendered a domicile in Winslow with orchard adjoining in which Samuel Wilston and Thomas Goodger now live. To the use of John Stevens and Jane his wife, who sought admission. Rent 2s, fine 5s, heriot by composition 2s 4d.

1726: Will of John Stevens
I Give ... unto my brother Thomas Stevens during the Terme of his naturall Life for his own use the Roome or Chamber wherein I now Lye belonging to the Messuage or Tenement which I purchased of Samuel Wilstone and Also Liberty of Ingress Egress and regresse Way and passage to and from the same through my yard and the Door way and Stair Case that leads to the said Chamber \and opens into my Yard and also the use of one of my flock bedds which are now in the Chamber/ Over the Hall and the Bedstead and other the furniture belonging to that Bedd for the terme of his naturall life and my Will is that after his death the said Roome and Goods shall goe to William Stevens my Sonn and I Doe Give & Bequeath the same to him accordingly Item I Give Will Devise and Bequeath unto the said William Stevens my Sonn and his Heires forever All that my Messuage or Tenement wherein I now dwell which I purchased of Samuel Wilston and the Outhouses Backsides and Appurtenances thereto belonging (Except that part thereof which I have herein before bequeathed unto Thomas Stevens my Brother) ...

1724: Manor Court, 1 May
William Gibbs out of court on 25 March last surrendered a cottage in Tinkers End in Winslowe now in the occupation of himself or his subtenants, containing 2 bays of structure, with barn, yard, orchard and backyard. To William's use for his life, then to John Gibbs and Ann his wife in perpetuity.
John Gibbs and Ann his wife, customary tenants, surrendered their reversion expectant on the death of John's father William Gibbs ... To the use of William Shelton, Richard Gibbs and William Gibbs the churchwardens and Henry Stutsbury and William George the overseers of the poor of the parish of Winslowe and their successors. On condition that if John Gibbs or any "Child or Children" of his family will not at any time in future be chargeable to or receive relief from the inhabitants of the parish of Winslowe, then the surrender will be void ...
[At the Michaelmas 1724 Quarter Sessions, John Gibbs was in trouble "for running away and leaving his family to become chargeable to the parish". Later he was "discharged on giving security", which must refer to this transaction.]

In 1837, among the cottages put up for sale by the Winslow Guardians were two thatched cottages in "Claydon Lane" in the occupation of John Reading and John Dumbleton. One must have been the property donated by Samuel Wilston in 1709 (perhaps as part of an agreement with the overseers), and the other could be John Gibbs' cottage. The unusual arrangement made by the churchwardens and overseers in 1724 could be due to their already owning part of the building.

The census returns above show that the building which is now Tinkers End Cottage formed two cottages with four rooms each (one of which was sometimes divided into two itself). It may have been among the cottages which Thomas Lomath owned (see below), and it came into the possession of Silvanus Jones:

1915: Buckingham Advertiser, 11 Dec
Sale of property of the late Mr Silvanus Jones. Lot 2. Two copyhold cottages at Tinkers' End were sold to Mr. John Watts for £50.
[Described in adverts as "Brick and slated Cottages in the occupation of Mr. Jabez Price and Mr. Thomas Turner"]


The Boot

The property which became The Boot was the house of Samuel Miller in 1700 (but can be tentatively traced back further). It passed to his son, granddaughter, then a younger son.

1652: Manor court, 26 June
Raph Udden heretofore did surrender the moity of one Cottage in Winslowe  To the use of Jane Udden his wife for terme of her life and after \her decease/ to the use of Elizabeth Symes ...

1666: Manor court, 18 May
Ralph Noone, customary tenant, and Susanna his wife surrendered half a messuage in Winslow. To the use of Samuel Miller and Mary his wife. Rent 2d, fine 5s.
Elizabeth Tymes widow surrendered and remised to Ralph Noone all title and interest which she had in a messuage in Winslow late Ralph Udden's.
[Ralph Noone's messuage, presumably the other half of this one, was left to his widow and then his 4 daughters in 1687. It isn't clear if the Millers acquired it too.]

1700: Manor Court, 16 April
On 10 June last Samuel Miller sr surrendered ... the messuage in which he then lived, to the use of Hugh Miller his son ...

1705: Manor Court, 25 May
Mildred Miller, an infant of 5 years, sought admission to a messuage in Winslowe which came into the lord's hands on the death of Hugh Miller her father ...

1726: Manor Court, 20 April
Nicholas Tanner of St Olaves Southwark, Tayler and Mildred his wife, customary tenants, out of court on 27 Oct last surrendered a cottage in Tinkers End in Winslowe now or lately in the occupation of Samuel Miller with all backyards and yards. To the use of Henry Miller of Winslowe Lab(oure)r and Elizabeth his wife ...

Henry Miller's children divided the house between them: the north part went to Mary, wife of Joseph Bliss, and the south part to Samuel Miller:

1733: Manor Court, 22 Oct
Samuel Miller & Hugh Miller desired to be admitted Tenants to a Mesuage in Tinkers End in Winslowe late in the occupation of Elizabeth Miller widdow (their late Mother deceased) which came into the hands of the Lord upon the death & surrender to the use of the last Will of the said Elizabeth ... [quotes will] ... Afterwards Samuel & Hugh Miller surrendered the said Mesuage to the Uses hereinafter mencioned: the South End conteyning a Lower Roome and a Chamber over the same and also that part of the Yard which is now staked out & laid to the said South End to the use of the said Samuel Miller. The other part of the said Mesuage being the North End consisting of a lower Roome & Chamber over the same and also the Outhouse and that part of the Yard which is now staked out and laid to the said North End to the use of Joseph Bliss & Mary his Wife.

The north part was sold by the son of Joseph and Mary Bliss to the Higgins family

1776: Manor Court, 4 Oct
Joseph Bliss late of Winslow labourer and Mary his wife while they lived held the north end of a messuage in Tinkers End consisting of a Lower Room and Chamber over the same and also the Outhouse and part of the yard staked out.  They died so seized and Thomas Bliss of Winslow labourer is their only son and heir.  He was admitted tenant. He then surrendered to Nicholas Higgins and Elizabeth his wife [nee Goodman].  Elizabeth present in court was admitted tenant.

1780: Manor Court, 26 Oct
Thomas Bliss of Winslow Labourer at a court on 4 Oct 1776 surrendered the north end of a messuage in Tinkers End consisting of a Lower Room and Chamber over the same and also the Outhouse and part of the yard staked out.  To the use of Nicholas Higgins of Winslow Labourer & Elizabeth his wife.  Elizabeth is since dead.  Now Nicholas desires to be admitted.  Rent [blank], fine [blank]

1815: Manor Court, 30 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/1)
Nicholas Higgins, late of Winslow Labourer, who while he lived held All that north end of a Messuage or Tenement in Tinkers end in the parish of Winslow aforesaid consisting of a Lower Room and Chamber over the same and also the outhouses and that part of the yard which was heretofore staked out and laid to the said north end … now in the tenure or occupation of William Higgins ... lately died so seized thereof and Intestate.  William Higgins of Winslow Labourer eldest Son and Heir .. desires … to be admitted Tenant.

Both parts of the original property were bought by Thomas Lomath, cordwainer and constable of Winslow. The earliest photos of what became The Boot show a stable or trap-house and a large building with a slate roof (built in the 1830s to replace the Higgins dwelling), and two small cottages, one tiled and one thatched (see the 1927 document below), which must be the south part of the original messuage inherited by Samuel Miller in 1733 and subdivided further (see below).

Boot with people outside
Repairs to The Boot, c.1900

1830: Manor Court, 25 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/2)
William Higgins of Winslow Labourer in consideration of the sum of £10 paid by Thomas Lomath of Winslow Cordwainer for the absolute Purchase surrendered All that Piece or Parcel of Ground situate and being in Tinkers End … part thereof forming the Scite of the North End of a Messuage or Tenement formerly consisting of a Lower Room and a Chamber over the same and certain Outhouses thereto belonging, which have been lately pulled down and the remainder of the said ground used as a Yard now in the occupation of the said Thomas Lomath …

Another property was also involved, and also came into the possession of Thomas Lomath:

1785: Manor Court, 28-29 Oct
Robert Eden of Bottle Claydon [see below] held a messuage in Tinkers End then or late in occupation of John Saving with the lower part of the garden and yard adjoining.  He bequeathed it after the decease of his wife to his daughter Elizabeth wife of Richard Scott.  Elizabeth is since dead.  Robert Scott is her eldest son and heir, and desires to be admitted.

1789: Manor Court, 29 Oct
Robert Scott of Winslow Cordwainer and Elizabeth his wife surrendered a Copyhold Messuage in Tinkers End heretofore in the Occupation of John Saving and now or late of Augustine Seaton, with the Garden and yard adjoining. To the use of Jasper Duckett of Banbury Pedlar, who desires to be admitted Tenant.

1832: Manor Court, 29 Oct
Jasper Duckett of Winslow Pedlar and Mary his wife in consideration of £20 paid by Thomas Lomath of Winslow Cordwainer surrendered a copyhold messuage in Tinkers End heretofore in the occupation of John Saving, late of Augustine Seaton, now of Jasper Duckett, with the yard and garden adjoining, to which Jasper Duckett was admitted on 28 Oct 1789. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

1838: Copy of court roll (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/3)
On 23 March 1838 Thomas Lomath of Winslow Cordwainer a Customary Tenant and Mary his wife ... in consideration of the sum of £100 advanced by John Hobbs of Great Horwood Shepherd did out of court surrender:
All that piece or parcel of ground [as above, 1830] And all that the Messuage or Tenement and other buildings erected by the said Thomas Lomath upon part of the said piece or parcel of ground now in the occupation of James Tuckey used as a Beer Shop and called or Known by the name or sign of the Boot … And also all that copyhold Messuage or Tenement situate in Tinkers End … heretofore in the occupation of John Saving afterwards of Augustine Seaton since of Jasper Duckett and now of George Alderman and the yard and garden adjoining  And also all those two Messuages or Tenements and other buildings erected by the said Thomas Lomath upon part of the said yard and garden and now in the occupations of John Massey and Thomas Scott … To which copyhold Messuage or Tenement yard and garden the said Thomas Lomath was admitted Tenant at a General Court Baron held … on 29 October 1832 on the Surrender of the said Jasper Duckett and Mary his Wife
To the use and behoof of the said John Hobbs.  If Thomas Lomath pays £100 with interest at 5% on 23 September next, this Surrender to be void.

This Boot was first licensed in 1835, but there was another Boot in Winslow in the 1750s (evidently on a different site) and an even earlier one on the site of Winslow Hall. The pub name was common in the area because of the legend of Sir John Schorne of North Marston, but The Boot in Tinkers End was certainly not built for pilgrims. Instead it became a "common lodging house", often accommodating large numbers of people including locals as well as itinerant workers (see the Census returns).

1839: Bucks Herald, 23 March
THURSDAY, March 14 – Before Mr. Baron VAUGHAN.
Thomas Jones, George Briggs, and Henry Weller, were charged with uttering counterfeit coin at the parish of Padbury. Mr. Roberts appeared for Briggs. Mr. Maltby and Mr. Birch prosecuted.
Jane Collier examined. – I live at the King’s Head; recollect two of the prisoners coming to our house; they had two young women with them; they asked for beds;  they were the whole night and the next day.
The prisoners Jones and Weller were identified by several witnesses as being together at several places endeavouring to pass base coin.
Mrs. Tuckey of Winslow, who keeps a beer shop, identified the three prisoners as being together at her house endeavouring to pass base coin.
The Jury acquitted Briggs, and found Jones and Weller guilty.  Sentence – one year’s imprisonment each.

Briggs was again indicted for having three counterfeit shillings in his possession.
Thomas Lomath, constable of Winslow. – In consequence of information I received I went to the Boot beer shop;  I apprehended three persons;  I afterwards apprehended Briggs;  I found him at the public house;  I cannot say if he was there when I apprehended the others;  in consequence of information I received I went with Loveridge and took a bag out of the thatch;  I have had it in my possession ever since.
Cross-examined. – It was about three or four o’clock in the afternoon of the next day I made search;  Loveridge was in the beer house when Briggs was apprehended; I told Briggs what I came about; the Loveridges were in the house in the evening;  there were many persons in the room when I apprehended Briggs;  I took Weller and Jones on suspicion of passing base coin; Briggs met them, when Loveridge swore to seeing Briggs place some base coin in the thatch of Tuckey’s beer shop.
Verdict – Guilty.  Sentence – eighteen months’ hard labour.

1845: Bucks Gazette, 6 Sep
The license of the Boot, at Winslow, was transferred from James Tuckey to Thomas Lomath.

The south part of Samuel Miller's messuage developed into cottages eventually acquired by Thomas Lomath from the Yeates family:

1774: Special Court, 10 May
On 1 April William Jarvis of Winslow labourer & Martha his wife surrendered a messuage or cottage in Tinkers End then in their own occupation, and all estate and equity of redemption. To the use of Robert Eden of Winslow, cordwainer. Rent 3d, fine 5s.

1777: Manor Court [this could refer to a different property]
Ann Eden of Winslow widow & Robert Eden of Winslow Cordwainer on 15 Feb 1777 mortgaged for £30 to Alice Gascoigne of Little Horwood widow 2 messuages in Great Horn Street and 2 messuages in Tinkers End in the occupation of Mary [blank] widow & Francis Savage.

1779: Manor Court
On 27 July Joseph Robinson of Aylesbury Taylor & Elizabeth his wife surrendered a Cottage in Tinkers End in the occupation of John Evans and all Houses Outhouses Edifices Buildings Barns Stables Yards Backsides. To the use of William Turner of Winslow Lacebuyer. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

Centre for Bucks Studies MS Wills Pec 27/1/69: Will of Joseph Robinson of Aylesbury, tailor, made 28 Feb 1776, proved 19 April 1781. Leaves everything to his wife Elizabeth Robinson.

1785: Manor Court, 28 Oct
William Turner of Winslow Lace buyer and Elizabeth his wife surrender a Cottage in Tinkers End late in the tenure or occupation of John Evans and now of Thomas Budd. To the use of Robert Eden of Winslow Cordwainer who desires to be admitted Tenant. Rent [blank], fine [blank].

1789: Manor Court, 29 Oct
Robert Eden late of Winslow Cordwainer whilst he lived held by Copy of Court Roll a piece of ground whereon the south end of a Messuage in Tinkers End formerly stood, and which were formerly in the occupation of Samuel Miller, and all that part of the yard which was formerly staked out and laid to the said south end, to which he was admitted at a court on 28 and 29 Oct 1765. And a cottage in Tinkers End now or late in the occupation of Thomas Budd, to which Robert was admitted at a court on 28 and 29 Oct 1785. And a messuage or cottage in Tinkers End formerly in the occupation of William Jarvis, to which Robert was admitted at a special court on 10 May 1774. He died since the last court. By his will dated 21 Jan 1786 he devised all his copyhold messuages and tenements to his loving wife Mary. Mary Eden desires to be admitted Tenant. Rent [blank], fine [blank]

1807: Manor Court, 26 Oct
Mary Eden of Whitchurch widow on 22 July last surrendered by Lancelot Wyatt gent. Deputy Steward a piece of ground [as described in 1789] now in the occupation of John Warner and part of the Yard [as above] and a Cottage in Tinkers end now or late in the occupation of Thomas Budd and a Messuage or Cottage in Tinkers End formerly in the occupation of William Jarvis and now of Thomas Kingston, to which she was admitted at a Court on 28-29 Oct 1789. To the use of Samuel Yeates of Winslow Lacebuyer who desires to be admitted Tenant. Rent 6d, fine 10s.

1835: Manor Court, 26 Oct
Samuel Yeates of Winslow Gentleman in consideration of £24 to him paid by Joshua Lewin French of Winslow Grocer surrendered All that piece of Ground in Tinkers End now in the occupation of the said Joshua Lewin French, containing in length on the West side 65 feet or thereabouts on the South side 18 feet or thereabouts on the east side 73 feet or thereabouts and on the North side 34 feet or thereabouts on part whereof a Cottage or Tenement heretofore in the occupation of William Jarvis Thomas Kingston and Stephen Cook respectively lately stood but since pulled down by the said Joshua Lewin French to which Samuel Yeates was admitted at a court on 28 Oct 1807 on the surrender of Mary Eden Widow. To the use of Joshua Lewin French who desires to be admitted tenant. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

1842: Manor Court, 1 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/4)
Samuel Yeates late of Winslow Gentleman deceased … whilst he lived held All that Cottage or Tenement in Tinkers End … late in the tenure or occupation of Thomas Budd and now of William Keys and George Reading with the piece of garden ground and yard thereto adjoining and occupied therewith (To which said premises with others the said Samuel Yeates was admitted … on 26 Oct 1807 on the Surrender of Mary Eden) under the yearly quit Rent of 4d ... lately died so seised thereof and intestate leaving Bridget Yeates of Winslow aforesaid his Sister and customary Heir him surviving  ...

1842: Manor Court, 31 Oct
Joshua Lewin French of Winslow Grocer and Martha his wife in consideration of £4 paid by Thomas Lomath of Winslow Cordwainer surrendered a piece of Ground in Tinkers End late in the occupation of Joshua Lewin French and now of Thomas Lomath [as described in 1835] to which he was admitted at a court on 26 Oct 1835 on the surrender of Samuel Yeates. To the use of Thomas Lomath who desires to be admitted Tenant. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

1844: Conditional surrender (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/5)
17 Jan 1844. Thomas Lomath of Winslow Cordwainer a Customary Tenant and Mary his wife ... In consideration of £180 paid lent and advanced by Bridget Yeates of Winslow Spinster did out of Court immediately after his admission to the Hereditaments lastly hereinafter mentioned surrender ... And also all that piece or parcel of Ground situate and being in Tinkers End [as described in 1835] With the two Cottages or Tenements one occupied by John Luckett and the other unoccupied and the Stable occupied by James Tuckey lately erected and built by the said Thomas Lomath on the said piece or parcel of Ground (To which … he was admitted … on 30 Oct 1843 on the surrender of the said Joshua Lewin French and Martha his Wife)
And also all that Cottage or Tenement in Tinkers End … late in the tenure or occupation of Thomas Budd since of William Keys and George Reading and now of William Burgess and the said George Reading with the piece of garden ground and yard thereto adjoining and occupied therewith (To which … he was this day admitted … on the Surrender of the said Bridget Yeates) [see 1842]
To the use and behoof of the said Bridget Yeates on condition that if Thomas Lomath pays her £180 with interest at 5% on 17 July next (in addition to £80 now remaining due by virtue of a Conditional Surrender of 14 Feb 1840 and interest which hath been paid) this surrender to be void

Despite its respectable owner, The Boot acquired a bad reputation:

1854: Banbury Guardian, 31 Aug
Winslow Petty Sessions, 25 Aug.
On the application of Samuel Rowe, of the Boot, at Winslow, for the renewal licence. Superintendent Thomas, of Waddon [sic], opposed it on the ground that the house was a "Padding Ken," and that on his being in pursuit of John Gilpin for hourse stealing, and of a person for stealing boots, Mrs. Rowe had not given him true information. Mr. Thomas appealed to Police Officer Ossett as to the character of the house. Ossitt [sic] said he looked on it as "Padding Ken." It was explained that a "Padding Ken" is a receptacle for rogues and vagabonds. The magistrates suspended the licence.

1857: Oxford Chronicle, 4 July
Winslow Petty Sessions, 25 June.
Samuel Rowe was summoned by Hannah, wife of John Stavis, for assaulting her at Winslow on 20th June last. Rowe is the landlord of the Boot public house in this town, and the assault complained of took place on the pitching in the front of his premises by pushing the complainant from the same, for having made too free with the characters of his niece and servant, which, though a peaceable man, made his "dander rise." Dismissed, with a caution to both parties.

1858: death of Thomas Lomath, 13 Oct (will proved 21 Nov 1859; property left in trust for his daughter)

1869: Manor Court, 25 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/7)
The Homage present that George Wood now or late of the City of New York in the United States of America Commercial Clerk eldest Son and customary Heir of Daniel Wood late of Kensal Green Middx Gentleman late a Customary or Copyhold Tenant of this Manor Upon the trusts of the Will of Thomas Lomath late of Winslow Cordwainer deceased by Thomas Price Willis of Winslow Gentleman his Attorney by virtue of a Power of Attorney under the hand and seal of George Wood bearing date 13 Sep 1869 and Thomas William Dickins of Horsley Street Walworth Surrey Beerhousekeeper only son and customary heir of Mary Ann Wood deceased Widow and relict of the said Daniel Wood formerly Mary Ann Lomath Spinster afterwards the Wife and subsequently the Widow of Giles Dickins which said Mary Ann Wood was the only child and customary heir of the said Thomas Lomath deceased  Did out of court on 19 Oct 1869 surrender by David Thomas Willis Deputy Steward ... [all the property described in 1844] ... To which said hereditaments and premises with others the said Daniel Wood was admitted Tenant at a General Court Baron  … on 29 October 1860  To the use and behoof of William Matthews of Winslow aforesaid Builder and William Henry Lomath of Winslow aforesaid Bootmaker … for and upon the several uses trusts intents and purposes in and by the said Will of the said Thomas Lomath deceased expressed and declared …

Thomas Lomath's trustees sold The Boot to Hopcraft's Brewery in 1870:

1870: absolute surrender, 2 Feb (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/8)
William Matthews of Winslow Builder and William Henry Lomath of Winslow Bootmaker in consideration of £125 paid by Alfred Hopcraft of Brackley Common Brewer, with the sum of £100 hereinafter mentioned make together the purchase money of £225 surrendered out of court by David Thomas Willis Gent Deputy Steward: [all the property described in 1844] ... now [in the occupation] of Arthur Henry Jeffs ... To which [they] were admitted Tenants at a General Court Baron on 25 Oct 1869 upon the trusts mentioned in the Will of the said Thomas Lomath deceased  To the use and behoof of the said Alfred Henry Hopcraft … but subject to a Conditional Surrender of the same hereditaments and premises bearing date 23 March 1838 from the said Thomas Lomath and Mary his wife to John Hobbs of Great Horwood Shepherd for securing £100 and interest … all interest due … having been paid to the day of the date hereof

Cyclists and pony and trap outside The Boot
The Boot, presumably after the repairs in the photo above; it was run by the Langley family at the time of this photo

1896: Buckingham Advertiser, 13 June
Winslow Petty Sessions, 10 June.
Henry Avis, labourer on the Metropolitan extension, was charged with on the 9th of June maliciously damaging certain property belonging to Thomas King, landlord of the Boot Inn, Winslow; also at the same time and place committing an aggravated assault on the said Thomas King. -- Complainant, who is an old man and blind with one eye, appeared with his face fearfully knocked about ... He had some rough characters to deal with, but had never been treated like this before. Defendant had lodged with him for a fortnight. -- Defendant pleaded guilty ... committed to gaol for one month for the assault, and 14 days for the damage.

1896: Buckingham Advertiser, 15 Aug
Deaths. August 7, at the Boot Inn, Winslow, Thomas King, aged 66 years.

The Boot was substantially rebuilt in 1927, taking on the appearance shown on the beermat below:

1927: Buckingham Advertiser, 12 March
Winslow Licensing Sessions.
Devil in the Boot pub sign and beer matOn behalf of Messrs. Hopcraft and Norris, Brackley, Mr E.J. Riley submitted plans of the proposed alterations to the Boot Inn, Tinkers' End, Winslow which was now registered as a common lodging house and it was decided to do away with this. The proposed alterations to the premises included the demolition of the thatched cottage and a portion of the back premises, also the trap house and bottom building at the north end. This would enable the tile cottage, which was in a very dilapidated condition and the kitchen and passage, also the second lodgers' bedroom to be rebuilt on the old foundations. The building would undergo a thorough renovation. The proposed alterations allowed for three bedrooms and the site of the old thatched cottage would add to the yard space. Supt. Callaway said he had inspected the premises and there was no doubt an undesirable state of affairs existed. Two men and two women were sleeping in the same room, with just a curtain as a partition and in another room one man and one woman slept. The rooms were in a very dilapidated state.

It was renamed The Devil in the Boot in the 1960s after its unique pub sign (showing a green devil peering out of a boot, in the legend of Sir John Schorne of North Marston - unfortunately we haven't been able to find a better picture). It closed in 1997.


Short Lane

Short Lane leads from Granborough Road to the land generally known as Hollow Furrow, and then to The Walk. It may represent an early route from the centre of Winslow to Granborough. The first official use of the name seems to be in the 1901 Census; previously it was referred to as Tinkers End Lane. The field between Short Lane and The Walk was called Bates Piece from 1850, and presumably took its name from William Bates, tanner, who was living in Short Lane in 1841. The two messuages mentioned in 1769 (alread subdivisions of one messuage) with adjacent land had become 8 dwellings by 1871. In 1946 "Messrs H. and A. Turney" were given permission to build a house on the site (now 7 Granborough Road), by which time all the earlier ones were demolished.

1766: Enclosure award
Refers to "a certain ancient enclosure belonging to the said Thomas Blake in the occupation of Richard Norwood" (a tanner) which was probably the future brickyard, and "a certain garden adjoining to the dwelling house of Judith Hatton", which seems to have been to the south of it, on the east side of Granborough Road.

1769, 7 Jan: Will of Benedict Holland of Hardwick, gentleman (National Archives PROB 11/1396/42), proved 5 July 1803
Bequeaths to his son Benedict Holland: all those my two Messuages Cottages or Tenements with the closes and appurtenances to the same belonging situate and being in Winslow aforesaid in the said County of Bucks now in the several possessions of [blank] Jennings and John Savin

1781 Land Tax
Benedict Holland owner; J. Saving & Rd Goddard occupiers; 3s

1786 Land Tax
Benedict Holland owner; Geo. Orchard & Jno Grubb occupiers; 3s 3d

1795 Land Tax
Benedict Holland owner; Orchard & Grub occupiers; 3s 6d

1803: Manor Court, 13 June
Benedict Holland heretofore of Hardwick but late of the Elm in the parish of Grandborough while he lived held two copyhold messuages in Winslow heretofore in the occupation of Joseph Tims and Indis Hatton, now of George Orchard and John Grubb, formerly but one messuage ... to part [of his whole estate] he was admitted at a court on 25-26 Oct 1768, to the other parts on 27 May 1791. He died since the last court having made his will dated 7 Jan 1769 devising all the property to George Holland his eldest son who desires to be admitted tenant.

1804: Manor Court, 29 & 31 Oct
George Holland of Hardwick Gentleman and Mary his wife out of court on 12 April last surrendered by Lancelot Wyatt deputy steward those two Copyhold Messuages situate in Tinkers End Lane [as described in 1803]. To the use of John Cox of Winslow Plumber and Glazier. Rent 5d, fine 10s.

1805 Land Tax
John Cox owner; Orchard & Parker occupiers; 3s 6d

1830: Will of John Cox, plumber and glazier (proved 1842)
... To my second cousin Thomas Cox of Fenny Stratford, Laborer: my 4 copyhold cottages or tenaments with adjoining orchard or piece of ground in Tinkers End in Winslow , in the several occupations of Philip Walker, Daniel Holt, Thomas Budd, Widow Phillips and Thomas Stuchbery, which I purchased of George Holland ...

1836: Land Tax
John Cox owner; Widow Budd, D. Holt & c. occupiers; tenements; 3s 6d

1842: Manor Court, 31 Oct
John Cox late of Winslow Plumber and Glazier deceased held two copyhold messuages in Tinkers End Lane in Winslow late in the occupation of John Grubb and George Walker, since of Philip Walker, Daniel Holt and Thomas Stuchbery, now of William Bates the elder and Daniel Holt, with two cottages some time since erected by John Cox on part of the ground adjoining, late in the occupation of Thomas Budd and Widow Phillip, now of William Bates the younger and George Walker, to which messuages he was admitted at a court on 29 & 31 Oct on the surrender of George Holland. Thomas Cox sought admission under his will. Rent 5d, fine 10s.
Thomas Cox was living in Short Lane from 1851; he died in 1876 aged 74

1876: Valuation by George Wigley of household furniture and effects late the property of Mr Thomas Cox, 1 Feb (Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/1)
Lists 2 bedrooms (with at least 6 beds), front room, small room, side room, wood barn. Total value: £5 16s.
Will proved 13 Oct; described as yeoman; effects under £200; executors Wiliam and Edwin Gibbs of Winslow, bricklayer.

There was a brickyard in Short Lane from at least the 1860s. The land was later sold to Winslow R.D.C., who used some of it as a tip.

1869-1877: Post Office Directory
Clarke, John, brick & tile maker, Tinker's End

1878: Buckingham Advertiser, 19 Jan
THE BRICK YARD, GRANBOROUGH ROAD, WINSLOW
Clearance Sale of the Valuable Stock of 20,000 capital building bricks ... 20,000 plain tiles ... by direction of Mr. John Clarke ...

1878: Articles of agreement, 18 July (Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/7/1891/17)
James King of Winslow, surveyor, lets the brickyard and premises in Tinkers End (for many years and now occupied by John Clarke) to Robert Clarke of Winslow, brickmaker, from 29 Sep 1878 at a yearly rent of £18 10s, with an additional 1s 6d payable for "every thousand of materials made in one year above 200,000". Excluded from the agreement is "a space about 50 feet wide along the east side of the Premises adjoining the property of Mr Dudley".

1883-1891: Kelly's Directory
Clarke, Robert, brick & tile maker, Tinker's End

Plan of Short Lane 1883
On this plan from 1883, the brickyard is the land belonging to Mr James King. The buildings are probably not shown very accurately.

1883: memorandum added to 1878 agreement, 15 Oct
From 29 Sep 1883 William Miller became joint tenant with John Clarke.

1891: note from James King dated 19 March demanding the tenants deliver up possession by 29 Sep.
In 1890 King paid Willmore & Bailey £5 on Clarke and Miller's behalf for coal "to burn a kiln of bricks".
Some of the goods were impounded by a bailiff on 18 Sep for £24 14s arrears of rent.
On 19 Sep Clarke and Miller empowered G.D.E. Wigley to sell their stock in trade: 37,000 bricks, 8,800 pipes, 800 coping bricks, 100 roof tiles. The sale on 30 Sep raised £84 10s 6d, and stock was sold separately for £23 3s 6d.

1924: Buckingham Advertiser, 15 March
Messrs Wigley, Son & Gambell are instructed to sell by auction ...
An ENCLOSURE of LAND and Garden Ground at Tinker's End, about 1a. 0r. 26p, with a pavilion and tool shed thereon. Vacant Possession.

1924: indenture, 31 March
Vendor: Lucy Midgley of Winslow, widow. Purchaser: The Rural District Council of Winslow.
All that small enclosure of land formerly a brickyard and then partly laid down to grass and partly garden ground site ... known as The Brickyard containing 1a. and 26 p. more or less as the same was bounded on the North by the occupun. road or lane leading into the road from Winslow to Grandborough at Tinker's End formerly in the occupon. of Thomas Bull and recently of George Arthur Midgley dec'd.

1931: Buckingham Advertiser, 21 Feb
The County Council accepted the tenancy of the land at Shorts Lane, Winslow, as a building materials depot.


Prince Albert Row

1840: Bucks Gazette, 12 Dec
WINSLOW. The western entrance of this town has been greatly improved, during the past summer, by the erection of a neat line of cottages, in front of which, in a circular niche, is placed a handsome bronze statue of Prince Albert, surmounted by the words "Albert place;" thus is the old cognomen of "Tinker's End" abolished, and the neighbourhood invested with royal dignity.

These were probably the best houses in Tinkers End, but the census returns suggest that they were sometimes subdivided. The plan below is from 1921, when they were bought by Miss Helen Monk.

Plan of Prince Albert Row

1921: Buckingham Advertiser, 26 Nov
Messrs Wigley, Sons & Gambell Have been instructed to Sell by Auction in 3 Lots, on MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28th, 1921, At the Bell Hotel, Winslow, at 4 o'clock precisely, A VALUABLE FREEHOLD ENCLOSURE of Rich ACCOMMODATION GRASS LAND, known as "Peasey Close," together extending to an area of about 6a. 1r. 9p., situated on the outskirts of the Town with frontages to the Claydon Road & Western Lane and comprising some good old Pasture. VACANT POSSESSION of Peasey Close can be obtained on completion of the purchase.
A range of 4 Brick and Slated FREEHOLD COTTAGES, with Gardens and Outbuildings, known as "Prince Albert's Row."
2 Brick Panelled and Thatched COTTAGES, with Gardens.
The site of the MISSION HALL and 2 strips of GARDEN GROUND.
[Later advertised as for sale by private treaty; Vendor: D. Wood, Purchaser: Miss H. Monk]

The two brick panelled cottages must be the thatched building in the photo below, probably the messuage of Robert Eden.

1926: Buckingham Advertiser, 13 March
Emily Rosa Neal, Bell Hotel, Winslow, applied for an order for possession of a cottage occupied by Oliver Geo. Averay, of Tinker's End, Winslow. She said she made the application on behalf of her sister, for whom she was agent and collected the rent. The arrears amounted to £7 10s ...

1927: Buckingham Advertiser, 18 June
Helen Celine Monk, of Winslow, applied for an order against Oliver Geo. Avery, for possession of a house and garden belonging to her at Tinker's End, Winslow. Applicant said she wanted possession of the house as the rent was in arrear and also because she would like to sell it ... She had been away for several years, and her sister had been taking the rent and had got into a muddle. The rent was 2s. a week ...

1928: Buckingham Advertiser, 29 Dec
Miss Helen C. Monk, of Winslow, made application for an ejectment order against one of her tenants, William Dormer, of Tinkers End, Winslow, upon the ground that he had fallen in arrear of rent to the extent of £2 16s., the weekly rent being 2s. Application granted, with possession in 28 days.


West side of Granborough Road

Tinkers End 1920s
In this image from the 1920s, a brick cottage visible in the earlier photo at the top of the page has disappeared; the porch of the Mission Hall (built in 1889) can be seen immediately beyond the thatched cottage, and Short Lane is on the right in front of the white building. The thatched cottage is still shown on the 1925 map but was demolished before 1939.

The thatched cottage is probably the subdivided messuage referred to in Robert Eden's will:

1765: Will of Robert Eden of Bottle Claydon, carpenter (proved 1766)
... Also I Give and Bequeath (after the Decease of my said Wife as aforesaid) unto my Daughter Ann the Wife of Job Osborne the East End of my Copyhold Messuage or Tenement Situate Standing and being in Tinkers End in Winslow aforesaid and were late in the Occupation of George Thorpe Deceased Together with the Outhouses Backsides and Appurtenances thereunto belonging ... Also I Give and Bequeath (after the decease of my said wife as aforesaid) unto my Daughter Elizabeth the Wife of Richard Scott All that my Messuage or Tenement Situate in Tinkers End in Winslow aforesaid and now or late in the Occupation of John Saving Together with the lower part of the Garden and Yard Adjoyning And all Appurtenances thereto belonging [see above] ... I Give and Bequeath unto my Daughter Margaret the Wife of William Earl (after the decease of my said Wife as aforesaid) The West End of my Copyhold Messuage or Tenement Situate Standing and being in Tinkers End in Winslow aforesaid and now in the Occupation of Frances Evans ...

1766: Enclosure Award
Mentions "a certain cottage and garden in Winslow aforesaid belonging to Ann Eden widow" on the west side of Granborough Road, which was called Locketts Lane at that point.

1785: Manor court, 28-29 Oct
After the decease of Ann Eden and Ann Osborne, William Osborne of Banbury her eldest son and heir desires to be admitted to the east end of the messuage (heretofore in the occupation of George Thorpe and Francis Evans). 
Robert Eden bequeathed the west end after the decease of his wife to his daughter Margaret wife of William Earl. Margaret, now wife of Christopher Samuel of Layton Buzzard shepherd, desires to be admitted.

Part of it seems to have been acquired by Thomas Lomath along with The Boot, and mortgaged to Bridget Yeates in 1844:

1844: Conditional surrender (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X/872/5)
... And also All that the east end of a certain copyhold Messuage or Tenement situate standing and being in Tinkers End … formerly in the tenure or occupation of George Thorpe and Frances Evans and which said east end thereof was for many years in the occupation of John Walker and is now in the occupation of Richard Wilmer (To which … [Lomath] was admitted Tenant … on 31 Oct 1842 on the Surrender of William Osborne and Mary his Wife) ...

The house mentioned below was freehold so doesn't occur in the manor court records:

1847: Will of William Jackman, tailor
... I give and bequeath unto George Dodson now living at Whaddon in the county of Bucks and who lately resided with me being the son of Thomas Dodson late of Winslow aforesaid Laborer and Martha his wife all that my freehold cottage or tenement in Tinkers End in Winslow aforesaid ...

1889: Buckingham Advertiser, 23 April
A small iron mission room has been erected in Tinker's End, at the expense, we understand, of Mr. H.J. Chinnery, and was consecrated by the Bishop of Oxford immediately after the confirmation service on April 3rd.

1890: Bucks Herald, 8 Nov
TINKER'S END HARVEST FESTIVAL. By special request of the inhabitants of this part of the parish, a special service of thanksgiving for the harvest was held on Tuesday, Oct. 21st. The little Mission Hall, in which there has been going on ever since its erection quiet, earnest, devoted work, principally conducted by two laymen, was most tastefully decorated. Most willingly did the organist and choir of the Parish Church render their services, and by means of their help was held quite the brightest and heartiest service which has taken place in that locality. The choir in their surplices went in procession from one of the cottages to the Mission Room, which was more than filled, a large number being compelled to remain outside during the whole service. The sermon was preached by the Vicar, and the service was concluded by the singing of the Te Deum.

The report below may refer to the brick building in the photo at the top of the page. It shows how bad some of the housing had become and who it belonged to (Mr Monk was the owner of Tuckey Farm):

1891: Buckingham Advertiser, 12 Sep
The Medical Officer of Health reported that two houses in Tinker's End, Winslow, and occupied by Mrs. Holt and Mrs. Warner, were in a most filthy condition, whilst one woman had six children and the other seven. -- Mr. Hathaway, Inspector of Nuisances, said the houses were in a bad state of repair. The ceilings were black and the floorings were bad ... Mr. Hathaway did not consider that in their present condition they were fit for human habitation, but this could be remedied. There were too many persons living in them. In Mrs. Holt's house there were two rooms downstairs and one upstairs, and the children slept upstairs and the woman downstairs. Warner's cottage was not quite so bad, it having two rooms upstairs and two downstairs. -- Mr. Vaisey said he did not think the houses were bad enough to be pulled down ... The cottages it appeared belonged to the Chairman (Mr. Monk), and he now intimated that he intended to have them pulled down, and he requested the Inspector to give the occupants notice to this effect.

1891: Buckingham Advertiser, 26 Sep
Winslow Board of Guardians. TINKER'S END COTTAGES. Mr Hathaway, Inspector of Nuisances, attended with his report. He said that he had delivered the usual notices to Holt and Warner to leave the cottages in Tinker's End. Warner had left, and Holt would do so as soon as he could procure another house. The Chairman told Mr Hathaway that he must press the case.

1901: Will of Henry Monk of Winslow, retired farmer, 11 Sep (proved 27 Aug 1903)
I devise unto my Daughters Helen Monk and Clara Humphrey as tenants in common my Cottages and Gardens and the Iron Room in Tinkers End Winslow my Close called "Peasey Close" and my Closes called "Parrotts Closes" in Winslow.

1915: Buckingham Advertiser, 1 May
Churchwardens' accounts: ground rent, Tinkers End Mission Room, 10s 6d.

1936: Buckingham Advertiser, 18 April
At the Winslow S. Laurence Parochial Church Council meeting on Easter Tuesday evening, Mr. Norman McCorquodale, Vicar's Churchwarden, offered to provide all the necessary materials for painting the Tinker's End Mission Chapel, Winslow, and appealed for volunteers among the young members of the congregation who would carry out the decoration. Tinker's End approach to Winslow was becoming very important, he said, and it was time that the Mission Church was got into better condition.

 

Copyright 18 July, 2017