Royal Oak

including notes by Ed Grimsdale

18th century Alehouse Recognizances show the Royal Oak to have been occupied by various members of the Hazzard family: Hannah (1753-65), John (1771), Catherine (1776-85). Hannah was the widow of Thomas Hazzard, innholder, d.1737, who previously kept the Royal Oak. His inventory shows that he brewed and kept livestock but apparently did not provide sleeping accommodation.

The Royal Oak at this date was at 14 High Street (Rosie's Bar in September 2014), described in its Grade 2 listing as "Shop and house. Mid-late C18. Vitreous brick with red dressings, moulded wooden eaves cornice with enriched dentils, slate roof, brick stack to right, 2 storeys and attic, 3 bays. Projecting C19 shop front with moulded cornice. Doric pilasters and central door. First floor has barred sash windows with gauged brick heads. Attic has 2 dormers with cornice tops and paired leaded casements."

1712: According to the Quarter Sessions, 17 Jan 1711/12, an appeal from the inhabitants of Mursley was to be heard by certain justices at the "Royall Oake in Winslow".

1714 manor court: The jurors were ordered to "mett together att the House of Thomas Hazzard called the Royall Oake" to settle some boundary disputes.

1715 manor court: The fieldsmen and steward were to meet at the Royal Oak to give orders about removing illegal hedges and ditches.

1767: The will of John Turner, surgeon, shows that he owned the Royal Oak.

1776: before enclosure, Catherine Turner owned "the garden belonging to the Royal Oak".

1775: Manor Court, 27 Oct
William Packer of King Street, St Giles in the Fields, brewer and Catherine his wife; Thomas Harris Turner of Drury Lane, St Martin in the Fields cabinet maker and Mary Christiana his wife; and Mary Turner of King Street aforesaid spinster on 23 Oct 1775 surrendered a messuage in Winslow called the Royal Oak in the occupation of Kitty Hazard widow, ... reserving to Elizabeth Turner widow and the owners and occupiers of her messuage liberty of ingress etc. with servants horses carts and carriages to the yard and backside of the messuage out of a lane called the Back Lane [=Greyhound Lane] through the yard or backside belonging to the Royal Oak.  To the use of William Harrup of Great Horwood yeoman, who was admitted tenant.
Catherine, Thomas and Mary were the younger children of John Turner; Elizabeth was his daughter-in-law.

1776: Manor Court
William Harrup of Great Horwood yeoman and Mary his wife on 19 April 1776 surrendered the messuage in Winslow known as the Royal Oak in the occupation of Kitty Hazard widow with all stables etc.  To the use of William Packer of King Street in the parish of St Giles in the Fields brewer who was admitted tenant through Benjamin Dudley of Winslow draper his attorney.  William Packer then surrendered the premises to the use of his will.

1781    Land Tax
William Packer (owner), Kitty Hazzard (occupier): 10s 3½d

1786    Land Tax
William Packer (owner), Kitty Hazzard (occupier): 11s 1¾d

1787: Special court, 21 Feb
William Packer sold the Royal Oak (reserving Elizabeth Turner's right of way as in 1775) to John Tims of Shipton yeoman.

In 1790 Catherine Hazzard moved to the Three Pigeons whilst John Williams took over at the Royal Oak.

1790: Manor Court, 29 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D 82/2/230)

            Surrender: John Tims of Biddlesden yeoman & Ann his wife
            Admission: John Williams of Biddlesden labourer

All that messuage or tenement or public house situate standing and being in Winslow aforesaid within the said manor called or known by the name or sign of the Royal Oak and now in the tenure or occupation of Kitty Hazzard widow together with all houses outhouses edifices buildings barns stables yards gardens ways waters privileges and appurtenances

1791: Manor court
John Williams of Winslow victualler, customary tenant, and Elizabeth his wife on 6 Dec last mortgaged the Royal Oak now in their own occupation to Thomas Morecraft the younger of Winslow butcher for £50 payable on 6 June next.

1792: Manor court
On 19 March last they mortgaged it to him again for £110 and interest payable on 19 Sep.

1795    Land Tax
John Williams: Royal Oak (owner & occupier): 11s 1¼d

1795: Northampton Mercury, 30 May

To be LETT or SOLD,
And immediate Possession given,
THAT old-established PUBLIC-HOUSE, known by the Sign of the ROYAL OAK, and now in full Trade, situate in COW-STREET, at Winslow, in the County of Bucks; and Consists of a Good Brick and Tile built Dwelling House, four Rooms on a Floor, with good Cellars, a large Yard, Gardens, Barns, and Stables; now in the occupation of the owner, Mr. Williams, Carrier, who purposes leaving the Public Business. The Stock of which is to be taken at a fair Appraisement.
For further Particulars, and to treat for the same, apply to the said Mr. Williams; or Joseph Dudley of Winslow aforesaid.

1795: Manor Court, 28 & 29 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D 82/2/359)

            Surrender: John Williams of Winslow common carrier and Elizabeth his wife
            Admission: George West currier

All that messuage or tenement or public house called the Royal Oak situate standing and being in Winslow aforesaid late in the tenure or occupation of the said John Williams and now empty and also all houses outhouses edifices buildings barns stables yards gardens backsides ways waters privileges and appurtenances.

This was evidently the end of the original Royal Oak as a pub. Perhaps the sign was sold, which would explain why the name emerged again within a decade. John Williams was still paying land tax on the "Royal Oak" in 1805, and his carrier's business was put up for sale in 1800.

1800: Northampton Mercury, 10 May
To be SOLD by AUCTION, By JOSEPH DUDLEY
On Friday the 16th of May, 1800 (and the following day, if required,) on the Premises of Mr JOHN WILLIAMS, Carrier, at WINSLOW, in the County of Bucks.
THE Common-Stage WAGGONS, CARTS, HORSES, HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE, and other EFFECTS, of the said Mr. Williams. Comprising one Nine-inch Wheel Waggon, two Narrow-wheel Ditto, two Carts; nine stout Draught Horses; Harness complete for eight Horses; ten Meat Hampers, twenty-four Meat and Butter Cloths; two Ploughs, and one pair of Harrows; Chaff Box and Knife; seven Cart Ropes, twelve Sacks, &c. The HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE consists of Beds and Bedding, Tables and Chairs, Clock and Case, Roasting Jack, Kitchen Range, Copper Furnace and Grate, Pewter and Brass, with various other Articles.
The Sale will begin at Ten o'clock.


The second Royal Oak was at 2A High Street (Crafty Cat in 2017). The premises were occupied by Robert Gibbs, grocer and tallow-chandler, who went bankrupt in 1781. Richard Mayne bought them in 1792 and sold them to William Mayne in 1804 but continued to occupy them. The shop was converted to a pub c.1805.

This building was originally part of the Angel Inn and retained access across the Angel Yard. It was run as a separate shop by Nathaniel Haselwood, draper (d.1689) and then by Thomas Urlwin, mercer, who bought it from Nathaniel's son in 1700.

1709: special court
Thomas Urlwin seems to have mortgaged two separate properties, both adjoining the Angel Yard; perhaps one of them was 4 High Street.
Thomas Urlwin on 8 May last surrendered by Thomas Wright and William Shelton sr a messuage in Winslow in his own occupation with barns, stables, outhouses, sheep-pens [ma(n)dris] etc., with liberty of ingress to and from the well or pump then standing in the yard belonging to the messuage of Thomas Foster lately called the Angell Inn, and liberty of ingress through the Gatehouse belonging to Thomas Foster's messuage (late the Angell Inn). To the use of Robert Grainge of Little Horwood gent. on condition that if Thomas Urlwin pays him the full sum of £150 (being the principal sum
[verso] of a certain writing obligatory for £300 dated 6 May[?] 1707
[several lines are illegible; there is a reference to John Markham gent.]
Thomas Urlwin and Ann his wife on 22 Nov last surrendered by the steward a messuage in Winslow now in the occupation of Thomas or his assigns with yards, gardens, backsides, outhouses, barns, stables, etc., with liberty of ingress "through" the common yard and to the "pump" (the messuage of Thomas Foster south) with an undivided third of the yard. To the use of John Markham of Winslow gent. on condition that if Thomas and Ann pay him £240 with interest on 12 April next, the surrender is to be void. Rent [blank], fine 5s.

1717: Manor court, 26 April
John Markham gent. and Thomas Urlwin and Ann his wife, customary tenants, on 17 April inst. surrendered a messuage in the Markett Place of Winslowe (the tenement of John Foster south, the tenement in the occupation of Thomas Spratley north). To the use of Dorothy Playdell of Buckingham spinster, provided that if Thomas and Ann pay her £102 10s on 18 Oct next at her domicile in Buckingham the surrender is to be to the use of Richard Smith of Padbury esq. and John Egerton of Bissister gent., on trust for such uses as Thomas and Ann and their heirs appoint.

24 Sep 1717: Dorothy Playdell spinster acknowledged herself satisfied of £100 and interest mentioned in a conditional surrender dated 17 April last by John Markham gent., Thomas Urlwin and Ann his wife presented at the court on 26 April last.
Richard Smith esq. and John Egerton gent. sought admission to a messuage in the Markett Place of Winslowe (the tenement of Thomas Foster south, the tenement in the occupation of Thomas Spratley north) which came into the lord's hands on the surrender of John Markham gent., Thomas Urlwin and Ann his wife. Rent [blank], heriot by composition 5s, fine 5s.
Richard Smith esq., John Egerton gent., Thomas Urlwin and Ann his wife, customary tenants, surrendered a messuage in Winslowe in Thomas' occupation with yards, gardens, stables, outhouses, and one undivided third of a piece of land called the Gateway belonging to the tenement lately called the Angell Inn, and of a piece of land called the Yard lately belonging to the Angell Inn. Thomas Urlwin, Richard Bigg and Thomas Foster hold the separate pieces of land in common. To the use of John Adams of Swanbourn Woollen draper. Rent 2d, fine 5s.

1747: Manor court
Richard Mayne of Winslow Malster, customary tenant, and Elizabeth his wife surrendered his half part of a messuage in Market Street of Winslow now in the occupation of Stephen Gibbs of Winslow Tallow Chandler. To the use of the said Stephen Gibbs. Rent [blank], fine 2s 6d.
John Gibbs of Winslow Tallow Chandler surrendered his half part of a messuage in Market Street of Winslow now in the occupation of Stephen Gibbs of Winslow Tallow Chandler. To the use of the said Stephen Gibbs his father. Rent [blank], fine 2s 6d.

1764 (proved 1767): Will of Stephen Gibbs (Herts RO 205AW9)
Stephen Gibbs the elder of Winslow, shopkeeper, bequeathed to his son Robert Gibbs, shopkeeper, "all that my Copyhold Messuage of Tenement in Winslow af(oresai)d wherein I now dwell together with the Barns Stables Outhouses Yards and appurtenance thereunto belonging".
Robert Gibbs was admitted as tenant at the manor court on 12-13 Oct 1767.

1780: Manor court, 26 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D 82/1/418)
Surrender: Robert Gibbs of Winslow grocer & tallow chandler and Elizabeth his wife
Admission: Charles Bowler of Winslow cordwainer
Mortgage for £100

1781: Land Tax
Robert Gibbs grocer (owner and occupier): 7s 2½d

1781: Sun Insurance 11936/289/437957 (12 Jan)

Robert Gibbs of Winslow grocer and tallow chandler
£
On his now dwelling house and stable only adjoining situate as aforesaid
250
Household goods therein  
80
Utensils and stock therein
220
Wearing apparel therein 
20
China and glass therein 
20
Plate therein 
5
Washouse only near    
5
 
-------
 
600

1781: Northampton Mercury, 24 Dec

To be sold by auction, for the benefit of the creditors, all the household furniture stock in trade and other effects of Mr Robert Gibbs, grocer and tallow chandler, at his dwelling house, on the Market Place at Winslow in the County of Bucks, on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday being the last day of Decemeber, 1781, and the 1st and 2nd days of January 1782.
All persons having any demands on the said Mr Gibbs are desired to give in the same to Joseph Dudley, draper,  at Winslow aforesaid. And all persons in any ways indebted to the said Mr Gibbs, are desired to pay the same immediately into the hands of the said Joseph Dudley, who is authorised to receive the same.
N.B. the house, which is well situated for the above or any other trade, to be let or sold by private contract

1782: Sun Insurance 11936/301/459597 (27 April)

Robert Gibbs of Winslow grocer
£
On his dwelling house barn and stable adjoining situate as aforesaid  brick plaister and tiled 
190
Brewhouse  brick and tiled 
10
 
------
Utensils and stock therein
200

1782: Manor court, 28 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/4)
Surrender by Robert Gibbs, grocer and tallow chandler, and his wife Elizabeth of a messuage in the Market Square in his own tenure.
Admission of Charles Lucas of Aylesbury, grocer and tallow chandler, who surrendered it to the use of his will.

1786: Land Tax
Charles Lucas (owner), Robert Gibbs (occupier): 7s 9¾d

1792: Manor court, 29 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/5)
Admission of Richard Mayne, grocer, to premises in his own tenure, on the surrender of Charles Lucas.

1793: Manor court
Conditional surrender: Richard Mayne of Winslow grocer on 29 Nov 1792
To John Hallworthy of Cowley, Preson Bissett, Dairyman for £100 + 4.5% interest payable on 29 May next
Messuage in the Market Square with Barns Stables Outhouses Yards Gardens Pightle Backsides late in the occupation of Robert Gibbs, now of Richard Mayne.

1795: Land Tax
Richard Mayne (owner & occupier): 7s 10d

1804: Northampton Mercury, 18 Aug

To be SOLD by PRIVATE CONTRACT,

A Desirable and substantial Brick-built and Tiled COPYHOLD MESSUAGE or TENEMENT, pleasantly situate in the MARKET-SQUARE, at WINSLOW Bucks; consisting of a commodious Grocer’s Shop, with an excellent Cellar under the same; a good Kitchen and Parlour, a convenient Dining-Room, in Front; suitable Bedchambers and a small Yard, with a Wash-House, Barn, and Stable adjoining.
hand with pointing finger The Premises are in good Repair, are well adapted for the Grocery or any other Business, or at a small Expense may be made a desirable Residence for a private Family. – Possession may be had at Michaelmas next.
***  For further Particulars, and to treat for the same, apply to Mr. C WILLIS, Attorney, or Mr. JOSEPH DUDLEY, Auctioneer, both of Winslow.

1804: Manor court, 29-31 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/6)
Admission of William Mayne, saddler, on the surrender of Richard Mayne and his wife Mary.

Alehouse Recognizances 1805-15: Richard Mayne, Royal Oak

1805: Land Tax
William Mayne (owner), Richard Mayne (occupier): 7s 10d

1808: Manor Court, 31 October & 2 November (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/7)
Surrender: William Mayne and Sarah his wife
Admission: Richard Mayne
Messuage in the Market Place of Winslow, called or known by the name or sign of the Royal Oak on 25 Jan 1808

1819: Northampton Mercury, 20 March
To be SOLD by PRIVATE CONTRACT
WITH IMMEDIATE POSSESSION
ALL the well-accustomed PUBLIC HOUSE, called or known by the Name or Sign of THE ROYAL OAK, situate at WINSLOW, in the County of Buckingham, adjoining the turnpike Road.
            The Fixtures, brewing Utensils, and beer Casks, to be taken at a fair Valuation.
            For a View of the Premises, apply thereon; and for further Particulrs, to Mr. DUDLEY, Auctioneer, Winslow.

1819: Northampton Mercury, 27 March
To be S O L D  by  A U C T I O N,
By SAMUEL DUDLEY,
On Tuesday the 6th Day of April, 1819, at the Royal Oak public house, Winslow, Bucks, at Six o’Clock in the Evening, subject to such Conditions as will be then and there produced.
ALL that the said old-established brick-built and tiled PUBLIC HOUSE, known by the Name of THE ROYAL OAK, in WINSLOW aforesaid, now in the Occupation of Mr. RICHARD MAYNE, the Proprietor;  comprising two front sitting Rooms, Hall, Bar, and back Parlour, Kitchen, and wash House detached, four convenient sleeping Rooms and three Attics, compact Brewhouse, excellent Cellarage, Stable, and wood Barn, with other necessary out Buildings, in complete Repair.
The above Premises are Copyhold of Inheritance, held of the Manor of Winslow with its Members, and equal in Value to Freehold;  the Fines are certain and very low.
The Purchaser may have immediate Possession, by taking the Brewing Utensils, beer Casks, and other Articles, at a fair Valuation.
For a View of the Premises, apply thereon; and for further Particulars, apply to Mr. WILLIS, Solicitor, or the AUCTIONEER, both of Winslow.

Royal Oak
Royal Oak, early 1900s

1820:  Alehouse recognizances
Royal Oak: John Hazzard
Then: Royal Oak: Robert Jones

1820: Manor Court, 31 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/9)
Surrender: Richard Mayne & Mary his wife
Admission: John Markham & Mary his wife
£230 in absolute purchase of the said premises now occupied by John Hazzard.

1821: Northampton Mercury, 21 July
FREE PUBLIC HOUSE. To be SOLD by Auction, By SAMUEL DUDLEY,
On Friday the 27th Day of July, 1821, at the Royal Oak, in Winslow, Bucks, at Six o'Clock in the Evening, subject to such Conditions as will then and there be produced, if not disposed of by private Contract, of which due Notice will be given,
ALL that old-established, brick-built, and sashed-front PUBLIC HOUSE, known by the NAME of the Royal Oak, in WINSLOW aforesaid, now in the Occupation of Mr. John Hazzard; comprising a good front sitting Room, and Bar, with a beer Engine, Hall, and back Parlour, four convenient sleeping Rooms, and three Attics, compact Brewhouse, excellent Cellarage, Stable, and other necessary out Buildings, with a Pump of never-failing Water.
The Purchaser may have Possession by taking to the Stock, brewing Utensils, beer Casks, and other Articles, at a fair Valuation.
The Whole of the Premises have lately undergone a complete Repair, are Copyhold of Inheritance, held of the Manor of Winslow, and are equal in Value to Freehold, the Fines are certain, and very low.
For a View of the Premises, apply thereon, and for further Particulars, and to treat for the same, to the AUCTIONEER, Winslow.

1821: Alehouse recognizances
Royal Oak: Robert Jones

1821: Manor Court, 29 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/10)
Surrender: John Markham & Mary his wife
Admission of Robert Jones & Mary his wife
Robert Jones of Winslow, plumber and glazier, paid £290. [Robert Jones was the occupier]

1821: Northampton Mercury, 24 Nov
To be SOLD by PRIVATE CONTRACT
And may be entered upon immediately.
A Good-accustomed PUBLIC HOUSE known by the Name of the ROYAL OAK, eligibly situated in the Market Place, WINSLOW in the County of Buckingham, at which a considerable business has been carried on for several Years past.
For Particulars, apply to Mr. MARKHAM, Winslow; or to Mr J.WRIGHT, Drapery, Northampton.

1822: Northampton Mercury, 19 Jan & 2 Feb
FREE PUBLIC HOUSE
To be SOLD by AUCTION
By SAMUEL DUDLEY
On Thursday the 7th February, 1822, at Four o’Clock in the Afternoon, at the Royal Oak, Winslow, Bucks, subject to such Conditions that will then and there be produced, if not disposed of by private Contract, of which due Notice will be given,
ALL that old-established and well-accustomed PUBLIC HOUSE, known by the Name of the ROYAL OAK in Winslow aforesaid in the Occupation of Mrs Sarah Jones, comprising a good front sitting Room and Bar, with a Beer engine and back Parlour, four convenient sleeping Rooms and three Attics, compact Brewhouse, excellent Cellarage, Stable and other necessary Buildings, with a lead Pump and never-failing water.
            The Purchaser may have immediate Possession taking the Stock in Trade, Furniture, brew Vessels, beer Casks, and other articles at a Valuation.
            The Whole of the premises have lately undergone a complete Repair, and are Copyhold of Inheritance held of the Manor of Winslow, and are of equal Value to Freehold.
            The above will be found an eligible Offer, as Proprietor is leaving this part of the Country.
            For a View of the Premises apply thereon, and for further Particulars, to Mr Wright, Drapery, Northampton; Mr Manning, Coach and Horses, Brixworth; Mr Wm Wilson, Solicitor, or AUCTIONEER, both of Winslow.

1822: Manor Court, 1 March (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/11)
Surrender: Robert Jones & Mary his wife
Admission: Sarah Jones
Including presentment of conditional surrender by Robert Jones to Elizabeth Jephcott of Northampton and by Sarah Jones to John Rogers and Jesse Parsons of Newport Pagnell, brewers, who paid £280.

1825: Manor Court, 28 Oct (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/12)
Absolute surrender of the Royal Oak Public House and premises in Winslow, Bucks by Messrs Rogers & Parsons and their wives Ann Rogers and Jane Parsons by direction of Mr. John Keys to Mr. Samuel Reeve.
Samuel Reeve of Leighton Buzzard, tallow chandler paid £290 & £25.
John Keys of Winslow, Victualler occupied the premises.

1828: Alehouse recognizances
Royal Oak: Samuel Bull

1832:  Land Tax
Mr Reeve (owner), Samuel Bull (occupier): Royal Oak, 7s 10d

1833: Huntingdon Gazette, 9 March
During the night of Saturday se'nnight, a black mare in-foal, about fourteen hands and a half high, rising four years' old, low in condition, marked with a spot of white on the nose, has been fired on the off hock, plain head, the hair rubbed off both shoulders by the cart-shafts in drawing, and a cut tail grown long, the property of Mr. Moorcraft, Winslow, was stolen from a close in his occupation in the parish of Swanbourne.
The same night, a brown mare, the property of Mr. Samuel Bull, at the Oak, Winslow, about fourteen hands and a half high, aged, has had her near eye knocked out, and received a hurt on the near shoulder, the hair of which is off, and a switch tail, was stolen from a close at Shipton, in the parish of Winslow.

1836: Manor Court, 4 Nov (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/14)
Surrender: Samuel Reeve and Mary his wife
Admission: Samuel Bull
Samuel Bull of Winslow, victualler paid £330 and occupied the premises. He and his wife Elizabeth Mary mortgaged the premises for £300 to Samuel Cole [of Tuckey Farm]. 

1839: Robson's Directory
Samuel Bull, Publican, Royal Oak, Market Square

1840: Bucks Herald, 24 Oct
Aylesbury Assizes: William Smith was indicted for having in his possession three half-crowns, knowing the same to be counterfeit, at Winslow on the 21st of August.

Elizabeth Mary Bull. -  I live at Winslow, my mother keeps the Royal Oak; on the 21st August saw the prisoner at our bar-door; he asked for threepennyworth of cold gin-and-water; he offered a half-crown and I gave him change; put the half-crown in my pocket; saw the prisoner again an hour after and he had threepennyworth of gin-and-water, again, and gave me another half-crown; looked at the money; saw it was bad, and gave the half-crown to my mother; did not see him again until the policeman took him; he was then differently dressed; took the half-crowns to the magistrates; have kept them ever since and now produce them; had a third half-crown in my pocket.

Cross-examined by the prisoner. – Had about two other half-crowns in my pocket; they were good; showed the half-crown in the tap-room, and a gentleman said it was good.

Mrs Bull.- I keep the Royal Oak at Winslow; am mother of the last witness; received two bad half-crowns from her on the 21st August; they are the same now produced.

Caroline Pearce deposed to prisoner passing a bad half-crown to her at the Rose and Crown, Winslow on the same day.

Lomath, the constable, said that as he was taking the prisoner into custody he took a half-crown from his pocket; laid hold of his hand and he threw the half-crown on the ground; I picked it up and now produce it; searched him and found in his possession seven good half-crowns, two shillings, and some copper, and two bad half-crowns, wrapped in paper which were in his cap.

Mr. Powell proved that the three half-crowns produced by E.M. Bull, and the one produced by Caroline Pearce were counterfeit, not quite cast but manufactured in a particular manner; as also the half-crown which fell from the prisoner.
Verdict - Guilty, Sentence, 12 cal. Months hard labour.

1841: Census
Market Square
Mary Bull, publican, 34, and family and lodgers

1841: Manor Court, 1 November (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/16)
Admission in trust of Samuel Cole and Richard Baldwin devisees of Samuel Bull by Will dated 16 May 1839 [proved 6 July 1841], who gave and devised the premises to his friends Samuel Cole of Winslow, dairyman and Richard Baldwin of Winslow, baker.

1847: Northampton Mercury, 18 September
WINSLOW PETTY SESSIONS.
Mrs. Bull, of the Royal Oak, Winslow, whose licence was suspended last sessions, was informed if she suffered her house to be kept open so late at night she would be fined and her licence liable to be withheld. – On her promising to keep a good house in future, the licence was renewed.

1851: Census
Royal Oak, Market Square

Elizabeth Mary Bull Head widow 48 Innkeeper b. Preston Bissett
Elizabeth Mary Bull Daughter unm 24 Innkeeper's daughter b. Winslow
Thomas Bull Son unm 18 Innkeeper's son b. Winslow
Ann Sandwell Niece unm 21 House servant b. Preston Bissett

1851: Bucks Herald, 4 Oct
[Mrs] Elizabeth Mary Bull was fined £1 for a short measure.

1854: 14 Dec (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/17)
Letter of Acknowledgement by Samuel Cole that the sum of £300 (under terms of above) is owed to Richard Baldwin of Winslow, coal merchant

1859: Buckingham Advertiser, 5 Feb
ROYAL OAK INN, WINSLOW.
Household Furniture, Capital Brewing Plant, 100 gallon Copper, Sweet Ale Casks, a capital Weighing Machine, and Weights, and other effects.
To be sold by auction by Mr. James King, on the Premises, Winslow, on Monday, 31st January [sic], 1859, at Eleven o'clock, by direction of Mrs. Bull, who is retiring from business.

1859: Bucks Herald, 26 Feb
The licence of the Royal Oak was transferred from Mrs M.E. Bull to John Mansell.

Royal Oak and Fulks and Son
The Royal Oak and Fulks & Sons, early 1900s

1859: Bucks Herald, 27 Aug
LICENCES: […] the ROYAL OAK, Winslow was transferred to John Brise.

1859: Manor Court, 31 October (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/18-20)
Surrender: Samuel Cole of Granborough, dairyman and Richard Baldwin of Winslow, coal merchant, devisees of Samuel Bull deceased and Elizabeth Mary Bull
Admission: Alfred Hopcraft of Brackley, N'hants., Common Brewer, paid £500.
Alfred Hopcraft and his wife mortgaged the premises for £300 to Richard Baldwin.

Mary Bull, widow of Samuel Bull, formerly of the Royal Oak died on 11 April 1866 according to the Bucks Herald. She was living in Station Road in the 1861 Census.

1859-1863 (reports in the Bucks Herald
John Brise was a fine cricketer. He played for both Winslow (married men) and Winslow Town. In his first match at Addington for the married men against the singletons he was the only married batsmen to score double figures – and that he achieved in both innings. In a close fought match, John Brise’s outstanding contributions ensured a narrow victory for his side. The teams later settled down for a hot meal at the Royal Oak, so John Brise’s name was toasted many times over. John Brise’s father also played for Winslow Town and that team was entertained at the Royal Oak by Mr & Mrs Brise after its home matches. In 1864 John Brise’s wife gave birth to a daughter at the Royal Oak.

1861: Census
Royal Oak, Market Square

John Brise Head mar 27 Innkeeper b. Thornborough
Mildred do Wife mar 26 Innkeeper's wife b. Winslow
Elizabeth A. do Daur   3 Scholar do
William do Son   1   do
Ellen Smith Servant unm 14 House servant b. Nash
John Barber Lodger unm 38 Groom b. London
Charles Clifton Lodger unm 25 do b. Bicester
William J. Pike Lodger unm 18 do b. Ireland

1866: Bucks Herald, 24 Feb
WINSLOW SUDDEN DEATHS:- [First at Crooked Billet before D.P. King, coroner, on the body of Hannah Ellit Bates, 77 years old, wife of Wm. Bates, labourer.]
An inquest was also held before the above coroner on the 22nd inst.  on the body of Newman Brise, aged 60 years. The evidence of Elizabeth, daughter of deceased, went to prove that her father was in his usual health until the 21st inst., when he came from his son’s house, the Royal Oak, Winslow, about half past eleven o’clock at night; that he partook some cold apple pie, and retired to bed; that shortly afterwards he was taken ill, and Mr Wynter, a surgeon was called in, who attended him, and gave it as his opinion that death was causd by apoplectic palsy. Verdict accordingly.

1871: Census
Market Square

John Brise Head mar 37 Innkeeper b. Thornborough
Mildred do Wife mar 35   b. Winslow
Elizabeth do Daur   13 Scholar do
William do Son   11 do do
Fredrick [sic] do Son   9 do do
Susannah do Daur   5 do do
John do Son   1   do
Elizabeth Brise Sister unm 33 Assistant b. Thornborough
Isabella Budd   unm 15 General servant domestic b. Winslow

1872:  Return of Public Houses
Royal Oak: John Brise
Owner: Alfred Hopcraft, Brackley

1876: Bucks Herald, 1 July
BUCKS MIDSUMMER ASSIZES
FORGERY AT WINSLOW
William Ridgway, 33, butcher and baker, was charged with feloniously uttering a certain forged banker’s cheque for the payment of £15, with intent to defraud John Brise, at Winslow, on June 15th.
(…)
Mr John Brise deposed that he kept the Royal Oak, Winslow, and the prisoner resided at the same place.  On 15th June prisoner came into his house and brought a cheque, which he asked him to change, for £15.  Witness said he could not. Prisoner asked for £3 on it, to pay the brewer, as he had been deceived in taking a bill, and had not enough to meet it. Witness then let him have £3 on it. The cheque was on the Bucks and Oxon. Union Bank, dated June 12th, and signed “John Hollis”. Prisoner did not repay the £3.

(Mr Hollis, baker & farmer of Great Horwood denied signing the cheque, but agreed that he’d helped the prisoner financially on several occasions.)

The Jury found Ridgway guilty and the Judge sentenced him to twenty months’ imprisonment with hard labour.

This was evidently the William Ridgway who had kept the Golden Lion.

1877: Directory
Brise, John: Royal Oak, Market square

1880: Bucks Herald, 6 March
LIQUIDATIONS
BRISE, JOHN, Winslow, victualler. First meeting of creditors at Mr. G. Crosby's, solicitor, Banbury, Mar. 16, at 10.

In 1881 John Brise was a general labourer living at the Churchyard, Winslow, and still there in 1891 and 1901 but "living on his own means". Saul Saull, previously of The Swan and The Bull, took over the Royal Oak.

1880: Bucks Herald, 2 Oct
DEATHS
SAULL.- At the Royal Oak, Winslow on the 23rd of September, Mr. Saul Saull, aged 47 years.

1881: Census
Royal Oak, Market Square

Elizabeth Saull Head widow 44 Publican b. Granborough
Elizabeth do Daur unm 17 Daughter b. Winslow
Rose do Daur   12 Scholar do
Clara E. Saull Daur   10 do b. Winslow
John C. do Son   9 do do
Pattie Bell Visitor widow 46 Annuitant b. London
Clare Syratt Servant unm 16 Servant, domestic b. Adstock

1883: Kelly's Directory
Saull, Arthur: Royal Oak, Market square

Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/13 (July 1884-May 1885): inventory of Royal Oak Inn (Mrs Saull)

Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/16 (Nov 1886-April 1887): inventory of Royal Oak Inn (Tomblin to Slipe)

1887: Bucks Herald, 30 April
A transfer was granted of the Royal Oak, Winslow from Wm. Tomblin to Mr. Sly.

1887: Kelly's Directory
Sly, William: Royal Oak P.H., Market square

1887: Bucks Herald, 14 May
Holdovers were granted of the Chandos Arms to E. Birkhead, and of the Royal Oak to T. Ginger.

1889: Manor Court, 11 Feb
Transfer of Mortgage.
Alfred Burton to Charles Lowe of copyhold hereditaments known as the "Royal Oak", Winslow, Bucks. Occupied by John Brise.
[Alfred Burton being the surviving executor of Richard Baldwin deceased; and Charles Lowe being requested to pay the mortgagee (Burton) the sum, by Alfred and Ernest Hopcraft the surviving sons, executors and trustees of Alfred Hopcraft deceased.]

1890: Bucks Herald, 19 April
WINSLOW – SPECIAL SESSIONS – APRIL 12
Before Mr. George R. Greaves.  ATTEMPTED SUICIDE

Edmund Warner, a native of Winslow, but until recently a London gas stoker, was brought into custody charged with attempting to hang himself on the 8th inst. – John Satin [=Sabin], said he was a gardener, and lived at the Royal Oak Inn, Winslow. He was at home on the 8th. from six to 8.30 in the evening. About a quarter to seven he went to the stable and found the door shut, he opened it and went in, when prisoner went by him and passed without speaking. Witness began cleaning his boots, and turning round saw the rope now produced tied to the beam. Witness called Warner out and asked him what he meant by it. Prisoner said that he meant to swing at half-past 11. Witness’s father, who was present, said that he should not do it there. Prisoner said if he couldn’t do it with that he would do something else, and pulled a razor from his pocket and opened it. Witness then took the razor from him and handed it to Sergeant Pitson. Prisoner had had some beer, but was not so drunk as to not know what he was about.
Prisoner, who said he was sorry, was liberated on entering into recognisances, himself and two sureties of £10 each, to be of good behaviour, and ordered to pay the costs. John Warner and William Gibson became sureties for him.

1891: Census
Royal Oak, Market Square

John Sabin Head m 51 Gardener & Victualler b. Sibford, Oxon
Christina do Wife m 47   b. Bodicote, Oxon
George do Son m 23 Gardener do
Sarah J. do Dau-in-law m 20   do
Amy M. do Dau   15   do
Frances L. do do   13 Scholar do
Henrietta do do   7 do do

1891: Northampton Mercury, 11 July
PETTY SESSIONS, Wednesday, July 8th.
Present: G.R. Greaves, Esq., and C.M. Prior, Esq.,
PERMITTING DRUNKENNESS – George Sabin, landlord of the Royal Oak, was charged with permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises. P.S. Pitson said at 11.30 on the 6th June, in consequence of a disturbance having taken place at the Royal Oak, he visited the house and on entering the taproom there saw Joseph Saving, of Winslow, who was drunk, leaning against the wall. Witness called the landlord’s attention to the state that he was in and told him that he had no right to have sold him drink. To this defendant made no reply, but defendant’s father turned him out of the house, and he followed witness on to the street. During the time the witness was talking to the defendant, Saving picked up a tumbler and drank its contents. Saving was afterwards summoned before the Bench, and pleaded guilty to being drunk. Defendant had not been summoned before, although he had cautioned him as to the conduct of his house. Defendant was an ordinary well-conducted man.
For the defence, Mrs C. Sabin, mother of the the defendant, said that Saving entered the house at 7 o’clock on the evening in question, and she served him with four twopenny worths of whisky and a “small lemon” each time. He ws sitting in the taproom quietly until the disturbance began. He was a regular customer, and they had no reason to complain of his conduct. Harry Smith came in at 10 o’clock and her son served him with twopenny worth of whiskey and a “small lemon”. When Smith called her son a rogue and said that he had done Saving out of his change. Her son did not like being called a rogue in his own house, and asked Smith to leave, which he would not do so, so she told her son to fetch the policeman. He could not find one, however, and came back and put Smith out himself. The Sergeant came in at three minutes to eleven. Saving was all right until Smith began, and then he did not want her son to put Smith out. They did not serve people when they were the worse for drink. It was twopennyworth of whiskey and a “small lemon” that Saving was drinking when the Sergeant came in. Altogether, from nine to eleven, he had five twopennyworths of whiskey and “small lemons”. Witness had known Saving to have plenty of drink in their house, but not to create a disturbance. Defendant was fined 7s.6d and 13s.6d costs.

1891: Northampton Mercury, 28 Aug
WINSLOW DIVISIONAL PETTY SESSIONS
WEDNESDAY. – Before Mr. George R. Greaves and Captain Harvey Piggott.
This being the licensing sessions for the year, the majority of the publicans attended and had their licences renewed without comment. The exceptions were the White Horse, Whitchurch, in which a renewal was granted on the representation of the brewer’s agent that a fresh tenant be provided; and the Royal Oak, Winslow in which the Bench cautioned the landlord that he must be careful as to the conduct of his house, or he would jeopardise his licence.

1891: Kelly's Directory
Sabin, George: Royal Oak P.H., Market square

1891: Northampton Mercury, 11 Dec
WINSLOW DIVISIONAL PETTY SESSIONS
WEDNESDAY. – Before Mr. Greaves and Mr. Prior.
Harry Foskett was charged with being quarrelsome and disorderly, and refusing to quit the licensed premises of the Royal Oak, Winslow on November the 14th. Fined with costs 12s.6d – Levi Foskett, a private in the Scots Foot Guards, pleaded not guilty to a charge of assaulting John George Sabin, landlord of the Royal Oak, on Nov. 14th – Fined 2s.6d with 15s.6d. costs, and for refusing to quit was fined 6d and costs 22s.

Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/23 (Dec 1892-Oct 1893): valuation (Sabin to Hall)

Amy Sabin married Charles Langley and kept The Boot, where her mother Christina was living in 1901, listed as a widow.

1893: Bucks Herald, 15 July
LICENSING: The bench granted a holdover of the Royal Oak, Winslow, to William Hall. – The applicant produced excellent references from the Royal Marine Artillery, and the Bench said that they wished he had taken a house which would do him more credit; they must tell him he would have to keep it in order.

1893: Northampton Mercury, 1 September
LICENSING SESSIONS, WEDNESDAY – Before Mr G.R. Greaves, Mr C.M. Prior, Mr M.S. Lowndes and the Hon. Cecil Fremantle.

This was the general annual licensing meeting and the following report was laid before the Bench by Supt. Lait:- "I beg to report for your information that there are 32 ale-houses and seven beerhouses on, one beerhouse off, and one grocer’s licence, total 41, in the Winslow District. The houses have been generally well conducted and no conviction has been recorded against them this year."
Appended is a return of the convictions for drunkenness during the year, which is the same as in 1892, 14 : - Winslow, 2 drunk, 3 disorderly; Nash, 1, 4 ; Drayton Parslow, 0, 2 ; Great Horwood, 0, 2 ; totals, 3 and 11. The Bench said that as regards the publicans this seemed very satisfactory, and they hoped there would be as clean a bill next year.  – Transfers were granted of the Royal Oak, Winslow to William Hall, and of the Swan, Great Horwood to James Arthurs. (…)

1894: Bucks Herald, 12 May
 PETTY SESSIONS, WEDNESDAY, May 9th – PRESENT: G.R.Greaves, Esq., ,  the Hon. Cecil Fremantle, M.S.Lowndes, Esq. and Mr. Thomas Biggs. (…)
Holdovers of the Royal Oak, Winslow and the Six Lords, Singleborough , were granted to Walter Dredge and Thomas Ball, respectively.

1895: Manor Court, 17 Dec (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/22)
Draft Conveyance.
Alfred Hopcraft Esq. and others to Hopcraft & Norris Ltd. of part of Partnership Estate of late firm of A. & E. Hopcraft and other property to Hopcraft and Norris Ltd. [The partnership of Alfred and Ernest Hopcraft was dissolved in 1890 and each could bid for the sale of all the partnership's assets. Ernest Hopcraft made the highest bid. Walter Harry Norris joined Ernest Hopcraft in business.]
In 1st Schedule, Part 1, is included "Winslow: The Royal Oak, tenant J. B. Sabin".
In 2nd Schedule, Part 1, register of incumbrances includes £300 on Royal Oak, - Mortgagee, F. W. Dougherty and H. J. H. Cook, executors of the late Charles Lowe.]

1896: Manor Court, 30 Jan (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/23)
Reconveyance of the Royal Oak, Winslow.
F. W. Dougherty & H. J. H. Cook to Hopcraft and Norris Ltd. (Brackley Brewery).

1896: Manor Court, 27 July (Centre for Bucks Studies D/X 1036/1/24)
Copy. Assurance of freehold and leasehold properties.
Hopcraft and Norris Ltd. to The Brewery And Commercial Investment Trust Ltd.
[Includes The Royal Oak, The Windmill Inn and The Boot Inn, Winslow]

1897: Northampton Mercury, 14 May
DIVISIONAL PETTY SESSIONS, WEDNESDAY – Before Mr G.R. Greaves, Mr. Thomas Biggs, Mr M.S. Lowndes and the Hon. Cecil Fremantle.
Alfred Alderman, of Winslow, labourer, pleaded guilty to assaulting Horace Whitman, at the Royal Oak Inn, Winslow on the 4th May, and was fined 4s. 6d. and 10s. 6d. costs. – Alfred King, of Winslow, discharged soldier, pleaded guilty  to refusing to quit the Royal Oak at the same time, and was fined 3s. 6d., and 11s. 6d. costs.

1899: Kelly's Directory
Goodman, William, aërated & mineral water manufacturer, & Royal Oak P.H. Market square
William Goodman previously kept the Crooked Billet.

1901: Census
Royal Oak Inn, Market Square

William Goodman Head m 65 Innkeeper b. Twyford, Leics
Elizabeth Goodman Wife m 65   b. Leagrave, Leics
Algernon Knight Nephew   12   b. Longeaton, Notts
Robert Phillips Boarder s 30 Groom b. Albrighton, Salop
Richard Morgan Boarder s 26 do b. Ludlow, Salop

1903: Kelly's Directory
Goodman, William, Royal Oak P.H. Market square

1904: Bucks Herald, 17 Dec
William GOODMAN, AGED 69, landlord of the Royal Oak, dies.

1904: Bucks Herald, 17 Dec
PETTY SESSIONS, WEDNESDAY, DEC 14. – PRESENT: Mr M. Selby-Lowndes and Mr. Thomas Biggs.
LICENSING – A transfer of the Royal Oak in Winslow was granted to Mrs Goodman, widow of the late landlord.

1907: Kelly's Directory
Goodman, Elizabeth (Mrs.), Royal Oak P.H., Market square

1907: Bucks Herald, 29 June
PETTY SESSIONS, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26. – PRESENT Mr M.Selby-Lowndes and the Hon. Cecil Fremantle.
LICENSING : The George Hotel, Winslow was transferred to Mr F.J. Walker of Northampton; the Royal Oak, Winslow to Mr T. Pullen, and the Golden Lion, Winslow, to Mr J. Wesley.

1908: Bucks Herald, 29 Feb
The adjourned licences from the last session were again considered, and the Bench decided not to renew the Royal Oak, Winslow, and The Wrestlers, Mursley, but to remit them to the quarter Sessions for compensation.

1908: Quarter Sessions, 15 May (Centre for Bucks Studies, Q/CM4/1 p.126)
Supt Pitson sworn: An old House - no back way - The "Bell" very near ... and several others ... This House is not so useful as the others.
J.T. Harrison for owners (Messrs Hopcraft & Norris): House exactly where Market Trade done - House has done larger Trade - only one change of Tenant in 10 years. [cross-examined] Last Tenant there 8½ years - went 1½ years ago - do not know that present Tenant does not pay the Rent or the Gas Bills. (Tenant in Court states he doesn't want to give evidence).
Renewal refused.

It was often considered that there were too many public houses and alehouses in late Victorian Britain.  This led to the passing of the Compensation Act 1904 by which, as its name suggests, pubs were not simply closed: the local Compensation Authority would make a final decision and award suitable compensation both to landlord and parent brewery. Actually, not all pubs were terminated since a loophole allowed them to continue through the assumption of the lowlier status of alehouse.

In August 1908, the Compensation Authority had sufficient funds only to deal with 12 of the 21 public houses that had been forwarded for closure. The Royal Oak, Winslow was successful. Mr. Thomas Pullen (Licensee) received £30 and Messrs Hopcraft and Norris (registered owners) £320 (awarded at Quarter Sessions, 24 July). By the end of 1908, the Royal Oak had shut its doors never to open again as a licensed public house. The premises were bought by Fulks & Sons next door, and remained part of "London House" until the late 1960s, when they were sold separately and became Goblin Market. The photo below shows the refurbished building with Fulks' sign hanging from the bracket which formerly held the Royal Oak sign.

Fulks & Sons

Copyright 28 November, 2017