The Station Inn/Hotel (63 Station Road / Station Cottages)

The Station Inn opened very soon after the railway station which it faced, at the bottom of the newly created Station Road. It had the same landlord for the first 30 years. The first known owner is William Neal of The Bell, and the Station Inn probably began as a business venture of the Neals. It was acquired by Morris & Co. of Ampthill in 1890 (they also owned some of the pubs near Bletchley Station) and refurbished; that is apparently when the extra stables were built.

Station Inn and Gasometer in the snow
Rear view of the Station Inn (built 1850) and Gasometer (built 1880), taken in the 1960s

1851: Banbury Guardian, 20 Feb
THE STATION.- Travellers to and from the Winslow Station have now the advantage of a house of public entertainment, where provisions are attainable.  The Station Inn is now open, and is found both useful and convenient.

1851: Census
Station Inn

Thomas Rawlins Head mar 29 Beer house keeper b. Buckingham
Ann do Wife mar 25 Household work b. Launton
John do Son   4   b. Winslow
Mary do Dau   6m   b. Winslow
James Stread Visitor mar 45 Nursery man b. Cumberland
Mary Vigors Servant unm 22 House servant b. Brackley

1851-63: Church rates book
Station Inn: Thomas Rawlins / Rollins   

1861: Census
Station Inn

Thomas Rawlins Head mar 39 Victualler b. Buckingham
Ann do Wife mar 35   b. Launton
Mary do Dau   10 Scholar b. Winslow
Martha A. do Dau   7   b. Winslow
Rose H. do Dau   5   b. Winslow
Ann Massey Visitor unm 15   b. Launton

1864: Post Office Directory
Rawlins Thomas, Station inn, Station road

1871: Census
Station Road

Thomas Rawlins Head mar 49 Innkeeper b. Buckingham
Ann do Wife mar 45   b. Launton
Mary do Dau unm 20 Dressmaker b. Winslow
Martha A. do Dau unm 17 Apprentice do b. Winslow
Sarah R. do Dau   7 Scholar b. Winslow
Thomas J. do Son   6 do b. Winslow

1872: Return of Public Houses
Station Inn: licensed 1850; occupier Thomas Rawlins; owner William Neal, Winslow

1876: Harrods Directory
Rawlings Thomas, "Station Inn", Station road

1881: Census
Station Road

Thomas Rawlins Head mar 59 Publican b. Buckingham
Ann do Wife mar 55   b. Launton
Ann do Dau unm 26 Dressmaker b. Winslow
Thomas J. do Son unm 16 Cattle drover b. Winslow

1881: Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/8 (May-Nov 1881): valuation (Rawlins to Neal)
Thomas Rawlins evidently retired at this point. He was living in Buckingham Road in 1895.

1882: fatal accident at the station

1883: Kelly's Directory
Silkstone Henry, Station Inn, Station road

1885: Inquest on Thomas Atkins (Attkins) of Buckingham, who drowned himself in Addington Lake, was held at the "Station Hotel" where the body had been brought. (Buckingham Advertiser, 25 April)

1887: Kelly's Directory
Bennett John, Station Inn, Station road

1890: Leighton Buzzard Observer, 27 May
The VERY VALUABLE FREEHOLD INN,
SUBSTANTIALLY brick-built and slated, free and fully-licenced, distinguished as the STATION INN, with brick and slated coach-house and stabling, adjoining Winslow Railway Station, on the London and North-Western Railway, and enjoying a large share of public patronage, and which, from its unexceptionally [sic] good position, must continue to command increasing trade; the substantially built, boarded, and slated CREAMERY; TWO Valuable Plots of FREEHOLD BUILDING LAND, all situate in the Station Road, Winslow.

1890: Buckingham Express, 31 May
SHOCKING SUICIDE AT WINSLOW.
  On Wednesday [28 May], Winslow was thrown into a state of unusual excitement by the suicide of Mr. John Bennett, the landlord of the Station Inn.  Mr. Bennett was standing near the front door, in conversation with his step-daughter, when he suddenly drew a revolver from his pocket and shot himself in the head.  Death was almost instantaneous.  No definite reason can be assigned for the rash act.
THE INQUEST
Was held at the Station Inn on Thursday before Dr. De’ath (Coroner). Mr. G. Dunkley was chosen foreman of the jury.
  Henry Scott, carpenter, living at Winslow, said he knew deceased.  He saw the deceased at home on Wednesday night shortly after ten, when he appeared to be in his usual health.  There was nothing strange about him: he appeared to be in good spirits.  Witness afterwards accompanied Bennett to the Swan, where they had some whiskey, and later to the Stag, where witness, Bennett, and others had a pot of beer between them.
  In reply to a juryman, witness said deceased did not seem at all depressed or threatened anybody, but seemed in his usual good spirits.  Witness never knew deceased to threaten to injure himself.  He knew Bennett had a revolver.  He never complained to witness about home troubles.  Deceased was a member of the Fire Brigade as well as witness.
  Caroline Amelia Bennett, wife of deceased, said they had been married 8 years.  Deceased had not been well for a long time.  He complained of pains in the head and could not sleep well since Christmas.  Witness had not noticed any particular depression in his manner, but thought he was rather strange sometimes.  Witness knew he had a revolver, and he was always acting about with it, so witness hid it at Christmas, but he bought another one last week. ...   He went out on Wednesday, and came back about bedtime.  Witness saw him on the sofa dozing, and asked him where he had been but he did not answer her.  Afterwards the deceased came out in the yard and spoke to witness, and afterwards conversed with customers, and sung while a gentleman played the piano.  Witness did not see the pistol till deceased shot himself, as he was standing at the front door between her and her daughter.  They had been standing there some minutes when he pulled out the pistol and shot himself.  He fell forward, and her daughter said, “Mr. Bennett, get up; there’s some people coming up the road”  Witness looked at him and said, “Oh, God, he’s dead.”  She believed he meant to fire in the air.  He did not say anything to her, but spoke to her daughter.  He spoke to witness several times in the evening, and seemed quite cheerful. ...
  Edith Mary Powell, daughter of last witness, saw deceased last night at tea time, but did not hear him threaten to destroy himself.  She saw him frequently; he was sober. ...
  Mr. Rolf Creasy, surgeon, &c., said he had attended the deceased early in March, when he complained of debility, and said he had influenza.  Witness had not seen him since then professionally.  He was called on Wednesday night between half-past 9 and 10, and came at once, and found deceased was already dead. ...
  After the parish constable had arrived, witness examined the revolver and unloaded it.  He found one empty cartridge and five loaded chambers.  In his opinion the wound was self-inflicted.
  After some consideration, the jury returned a verdict of “Death from self-inflicted pistol shot wound.”

1890: Winslow Petty Sessions, 11 June
Holdover granted to Caroline Amelia Emily Bennett, widow

1890: sale by Geo. Wigley, 11 June
The Station Inn, Winslow, bought by Messrs. Morris & Co., brewers, Ampthill, for £1,320.

1890: Bicester Herald, 13 June
  THE LATE MR. JOHN BENNETT, of the Station Inn, Winslow, who shot himself on May 28, was a son of Mr. A. Bennett, tailor, Oxford, and married the widow of the late Mr. W. Powell, of the Bell Inn, Corn Market-street, Oxford.
  FIREMAN’S FUNERAL AT WINSLOW.- The internment of the remains of the late Mr. John Bennett took place on Saturday, May 31, at Winslow.  Being a member of the Fire Brigade the coffin was carried by firemen in uniform.  On it was his helmet, boots, belt, &c.

1890: Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/23, p.10.  Valuation of fixtures & fittings for representatives of late Mr Bennett and Messrs Morris & Co., 5 Aug 1890.  Back parlour, bar, smoke room, tap room, pantry, passage, cellar.  £15 12s 6d. + £42 10s for adjoining plot.

1890: Winslow Petty Sessions, 29 Oct
Licence transferred to Jonas Hillyer.

1890: Buckingham Advertiser, 1 Nov
After ten years residence at the George, Mr. Hillyer has now removed to the Station Inn at Winslow, and which we hear is to undergo extensive renovation.

1891: Kelly's Directory
Hillyer Jonas, Station Inn, Station road

1891: Census
Station Inn

Jonas Hillyer Head mar 48 Licensed victualler b. Old Wolverton
Hannah do Wife mar 51   b. Holcott, Northants

1891: Winslow Rural Sanitary Authority, 28 Oct
Plans for alterations to the Station Inn submitted and approved.

Maps showing Station Inn and surroundings
The maps above show the Station Inn in 1880 and 1923

1893-94: Centre for Bucks Studies D/WIG/2/1/27 (Oct 1893-Oct 1894): valuation (Hillyer to Brackstone)

1894: Winslow Petty Sessions, 27 June
Licence transferred to Alfred Braxton [sic].

1894: Buckingham Advertiser, 18 Aug
  Mr. Baron Franks, Dentist, of Oxford, attends at 1, Well Street, Buckingham, EVERY Saturday, from 11 a.m. till 5 p.m., and at Winslow, Railway Inn, from 5.30 till 6.30 p.m.

1895: Kelly's Directory
Brackston Alfred, Station inn; excellent stables & loose boxes, every accommodation for gentlemen’s hunters, Station road

1895: Winslow Petty Sessions, 22 May
Holdover granted to John Lines.

1899-1907: Kelly's Directory
Lines John, Station hotel P.H. Station road

1901: Census
Station Inn

John Lines Head mar 65 Licensed victualler b. Eydon, Northants
Elizabeth do Wife mar 67   b. Weston, Northants
Gladys Richard Gdau   4   b. Tottenham
Eliza Sly Servant wid 69 General servant b. Filkins, Oxon

1906, 26 March: death of Elizabeth Lines of the Station Inn aged 72

1910 Survey: Station Inn
Occupier: James M. Payne
Owner: Tauquery & Smith, Ampthill Brewery

1910: Buckingham Advertiser, 30 Sep
  OBITUARY.- Mr. John Lines (formerly landlord of the Station Inn) was interred here on Friday last, aged 75 years.  While at the Station Inn he was much respected and liked, and only gave up on account of failing health.  His son, Mr. Edward Lines, was for a good number of years landlord of the King’s Head, and predeceased his father by only three or four months.

1911: Kelly's Directory
Payne James Martin, Station hotel, Station road

1911: Census
Station Inn, 8 rooms

James Martin Payne Head mar 55 Publican b. Luton
Harriett do Wife mar 52 married 34 years b. Ampthill
Elsie Harriet Burton Gdau   7   b. Bedford
Sarah Jayne Payne junr Dau in law mar 30 married 4 years b. Bedford
John Edward Payne Gson   3   b. Bedford

1914: Winslow Petty Sessions, 12 June
Licence transferred to Ernest Charles Giltrow.

1915 & 1924: Kelly's Directory
Giltrow Ernest Charles, Station hotel, Station road

1916: Buckingham Advertiser, 25 Nov (report of the Winslow Tribunal dealing with conscription cases)
  The landlord of the Station Inn, Winslow, aged 28, passed for general service, was allowed till 1st April on condition he joined the V.T.C.- Applicant has three brothers serving, and one killed, he himself having served as a butcher on board a liner, and it was stated that his wife could not carry on the house as it was used for putting conveyances up.

1918: Buckingham Advertiser, 29 June
PETTY SESSIONS, Friday, June 21st,
Before the Hon. Cecil Fremantle, N. McCorquodale, Esq., J. M. Missenden, Esq., and E. A. Illing, Esq.
ALLEGED BREACH OF THE LICENSING ACT. CASE DISMISSED.
Florence Mary Giltrow, licensee of the Station Inn, Winslow was charged with permitting drunkenness on her premises on June 8th.- The case arose out of a conviction of three women charged with being drunk at the previous sessions and fined 10s. each.
  Supt. Dibben conducted the prosecution, and Mr. R. Hobourne, of Woburn, defended.  Mr. A. E. Pinfold, secretary of the Licensed Victuallers’ Association, was also present.  The following evidence was taken:-
  Caroline McClary, of 10, Shamrock Street, Clapham Common, London, stated that on the 8th inst. she left London for Winslow.  They changed at Bletchley, where she had a Guinness, and then came to Winslow, arriving about five minutes to 2.  On leaving the railway station they went straight into the Station Inn, and there she had a scotch whiskey; either a drop or half-quartern, she could not say which.  She paid, but could not say how much.  There was one for herself, one for Mrs. Coles, and one for Mrs. Illsley, who met them at the station.  Witness paid for all three.  They had one more whiskey later.  She did not pay for that, and could not say who did.  They sat there for some time talking, but she could not say what time they left the house.  They went up to the Swan yard to get a trap.  She did not have anything to drink there, and only knew she was sitting down.  She was then arrested on a charge of drunkenness, to which she pleaded guilty a week ago.  She had no other drink in Winslow.
  Cross-examined: She was quite sober when she went into the Station Inn, and when she left she was all right.  She had occasion to go upstairs and wash; it was a dangerous staircase, but she went up and down all right.  She had something to eat and a talk, and a railway porter came in while she was there.  That was something about a quarter past 2, and she was asking him about the trains.  She was quite sure she and the other two women were absolutely sober. ...
  George Page, porter at the L. and N. W. Station, stated he saw two women come off the 1.55 train, and the other one meet them.  He saw them leave the station premises, and they were quite sober.  Witness went in to the Station Inn about a quarter or twenty minutes past 2 and saw the women there.  They were standing up against the table having some refreshments, some spirits.  The three seemed quite natural and perfectly sober.  They were talking about trains to London, and he stood talking with them some minutes.  Witness went in the house again about 10 minutes or quarter past 3, and did not see them there.
  Cross-examined:  Witness frequently went to the inn, and always looked up the road when he came out.  He did so on this occasion, but did not see anything of the women.  He could see right up to the Police Station, but could not see them. ...
  The Bench were not satisfied the women were drunk while on defendant’s premises, and dismissed the case.

The pianist Mrs Mills (nee Gladys Jordan, 1918-1978) is supposed to have been born at the Station Inn, but we haven't yet found anything to substantiate this. Her birth was registered at West Ham.

1920: Winslow Petty Sessions, 6 Feb
Licence transferred from Mrs Florence May Giltrow to her husband Mr Ernest Charles Giltrow now demobilised.

1925: bought by Aylesbury Brewery Company for £1,536 (http://breweryhistory.com/wiki/index.php?title=List_of_ABC_Ltd_pubs)

1925: Winslow police court, 10 July
Licence of the Station Inn transferred from Edward Charles Giltroe [sic] to Edward Vine

1928: Kelly's Directory
Vine Edward, Station hotel, Station road, Tel.no.54

1939: Kelly's Directory
Station Inn (Edward Vine), Station road, Tel.no.54

1961: closed

1962: sold as a private house

Aerial view of Station Road
This photo from 1963 shows the former Station Inn on the right

Copyright 4 October, 2021